Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. Photo: Iranian Presidency/Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

A federal grand jury has indicted Monica Witt, a former U.S. Air Force counterintelligence officer, with spying for the government of Iran and assisting Iranian intelligence services in leading a cyber campaign against her former colleagues.

Details: The Iranian operation sought to deploy malware through fake social media accounts in 2014 and 2015 in order to gain access to the targets' computers and networks. Witt allegedly revealed to the Iranian regime a "highly classified intelligence program" and the identity of a former fellow intelligence officer, actions that Air Force Special Agent Terry Phillips called "a betrayal of our nation’s security, our military, and the American people." Witt remains at large as one of the FBI’s "most wanted" criminals.

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The story of American businesses in the coronavirus pandemic is a tale of two markets — one made up of tech firms and online retailers as winners awash in capital, and another of brick-and-mortar mom-and-pop shops that is collapsing.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic has created an environment where losing industries like traditional retail and hospitality as well as a sizable portion of firms owned by women, immigrants and people of color are wiped out and may be gone for good.

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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Survey: Fears grow about Social Security’s future

Data: AARP survey of 1,441 U.S. adults conducted July 14–27, 2020 a ±3.4% margin of error at the 95% confidence level; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Younger Americans are increasingly concerned that Social Security won't be enough to wholly fall back on once they retire, according to a survey conducted by AARP — in honor of today's 85th anniversary of the program — given first to Axios.

Why it matters: Young people's concerns about financial insecurity once they're on a restricted income are rising — and that generation is worried the program, which currently pays out to 65 million beneficiaries, won't be enough to sustain them.