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Protesters at the Hague during a visit from Chinese Prime Minister Li Keqiang. Photo: Pierre Crom/Getty Images

In its annual report released today, the bipartisan Congressional-Executive Commission on China (CECC) said that there is a "strong argument" that China has committed "crimes against humanity" in its northwestern region of Xinjiang.

Why it matters: A growing number of voices, in and out of government, are saying that China's mass detention camps clearly violate international law.

The commission listed several acts committed by the Chinese government in Xinjiang that could, under the Rome statute of the International Criminal Court, support a legal case that China has committed "crimes against humanity."

Context: The 323-page annual report provides detailed information on human rights developments in China in 2019.

  • The report includes sections on freedom of speech, criminal justice, worker rights, civil rights, ethnic minority policy, freedom of religion, public health, Tibet, Xinjiang, Hong Kong, and other topics.
  • It also details China's policies of repression of religion and society among Turkic Muslim groups in Xinjiang, including detention camps, intrusive surveillance, forced labor, and forced family separations.

What they're saying:

  • "Scholars and rights groups provided a strong argument, based on available evidence, that the 'crimes against humanity' framework may apply to the case of mass internment camps" in Xinjiang, according to the report.
  • "Article 7 of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court provides a list of 11 acts that may constitute 'crimes against humanity' 'when committed against a widespread or systematic attack directed against any civilian population.'"

Details: The report listed 4 acts committed by Chinese authorities that could quality as crimes against humanity under the Rome Statute:

  • The arbitrary detention of Uighur, Kazakh, and other ethnic minorities in China in well-documented mass internment camps;
  • The torture of detainees in those camps;
  • The detention of people and suppression of religious and cultural traditions in ways clearly targeted against specific minority groups;
  • The forced disappearances of hundreds of intellectuals in the region.

The commission also called on governments to consider levying sanctions on China under the Global Magnitsky Act for its campaign of repression against Muslim minorities.

The big picture: The Chinese government has attempted to suppress global criticism of its policies in Xinjiang, but those criticisms are only getting louder.

Go deeper

36 mins ago - Health

WHO: AstraZeneca vaccine must be evaluated on "more than a press release"

A medical syringe and vial with fake coronavirus vaccine in front of the World Health Organization (WHO) logo. Photo Illustration: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Top scientists at the World Health Organization on Friday called for more detailed information on a coronavirus vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford.

Why it matters: Oxford and AstraZeneca have said the vaccine was 90% effective in people who got a half dose followed by a full dose, and 62% effective in people who got two full doses. AstraZeneca has since acknowledged that the smaller dose received by some participants was the result of an error by a contractor, per the New York Times.

Court rejects Trump campaign's appeal in Pennsylvania case

Photo: Sarah Silbiger for The Washington Post via Getty Images

A federal appeals court on Friday unanimously rejected the Trump campaign's emergency appeal seeking to file a new lawsuit against Pennsylvania's election results, writing in a blistering ruling that the campaign's "claims have no merit."

Why it matters: It's another devastating blow to President Trump's sinking efforts to overturn the results of the election. Pennsylvania, which President-elect Joe Biden won by more than 80,000 votes, certified its results last week and is expected to award 20 electoral votes to Biden on Dec. 12.

Dave Lawler, author of World
3 hours ago - World

Belarus dictator Lukashenko says he'll leave post after new constitution

Photo: Valery Sharifulin\TASS via Getty

Longtime Belarusian President Aleksandr Lukashenko has said he will step down after a new constitution comes into force, according to Belarusian state media.

Why it matters: Lukashenko has faced three months of protests following a rigged election in August. He has promised to reform the constitution to reduce the near-absolute powers of the president, but has insisted that his strong hand is needed to see that process through.