U.S.-China trade talks are extended

Chinese Vice Premier Liu He (center) with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (right) and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin (left) at Feb. 21 trade talks in D.C. Photo: Liu Jie/Xinhua/via Getty Images

The latest round of U.S.-China talks will continue for another two days.

What's happening, from AP:

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Details: According to various reports, the two sides reached a deal on currency stability, the Chinese agreed to buy more U.S. goods, and Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping are likely to meet at Mar-a-Lago in late March.

Yes, but: There remain significant unresolved issues, as Bloomberg writes...

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My thought bubble: It sounds like the easy wins have been made (they were there for the taking, for a long time). The Chinese have resisted significant concessions and it's not clear what leverage the American president wants to use before March 1 to convince them to move much more.

Go deeper:

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