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Reproduced from S&P Global; Table: Axios Visuals

U.S. banks had a fantastic first quarter in terms of new deposits, with the top 50 banks adding nearly $2 trillion of assets, more than 10 times the average quarterly increase for the entire banking sector.

What happened: The 50 largest U.S. banks added $1.853 trillion in assets during the first quarter, a report from S&P Global Market Intelligence shows.

  • That compares to an average of $142 billion in assets added each quarter dating back to 1999 and an average of $118 billion increase since 2009, according to an Axios analysis of banking data produced by the Fed.

Highlights: All but six of the 50 largest U.S. banks reported an increase in assets during the first quarter.

  • JPMorgan Chase, the country's largest bank by assets, reported a $452.05 billion increase in assets in the first quarter, which was larger than the total assets held at all but nine U.S. banks.
  • Bank of America, Citigroup and Wells Fargo reported increases of $185.88 billion, $268.61 billion and $53.79 billion, respectively.

Between the lines: A separate report from S&P earlier this week found that close to 1,000 credit unions reported a net loss in the first quarter.

  • "Specifically, 982 credit unions representing 18.5% of the industry lost money during this time period, up from 15% in the first quarter of 2019," S&P Global Market Intelligence noted in the report Tuesday.

Go deeper: Central banks load up for a long war against coronavirus

Go deeper

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
Sep 3, 2020 - Economy & Business

A second startup becomes a bank

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

You wait 10 years for the Office of the Comptroller of Currency to start approving bank charters for startup banks, and then two arrive in less than month.

Driving the news: Thursday morning, a quiet startup named Jiko announced that it had obtained a bank charter by acquiring its partner bank, Mid-Central National Bank of Minnesota.

Japan to release Fukushima water into sea

People near storage tanks for radioactive water at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, in 2020. Photo: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images

Japan's government on Tuesday announced plans to release more than 1 million metric tons of contaminated water from the destroyed Fukushima nuclear plant in the Pacific Ocean following a treatment process.

Why it matters: While the Biden administration has said Japan appears to have met globally accepted nuclear safety standards, officials in South Korea, China and Taiwan, local residents, those in the fishing industry and green groups oppose the plans, due to begin in about two years, per the Guardian.

In photos: Twin Cities on edge after Daunte Wright shooting

Demonstrators shout "Don't shoot" at the police after curfew on April 12 as they protest the death of Daunte Wright, who was shot and killed by a police officer in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, a day earlier. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

There were tense scenes in the Twin Cities suburb of Brooklyn Center Monday night, after demonstrators defied a 7 p.m. curfew to protest for a second night the fatal police shooting of Daunte Wright.

The big picture: The curfew was announced following a night of protests and unrest over the killing of Wright, 20, during a traffic stop Sunday. Following peaceful protests and a daytime vigil, police again deployed tear gas during clashes with protesters Monday night, according to reporters on the scene.