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Georgetown University students voted to pay reparations in April 2019. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Universities across the country have publicly examined their ties to slavery and leading the charge to pay reparations — including renaming buildings, addressing controversial monuments and issuing public apologies, AP reports.

Why it matters: The U.S. has discussed reparations for decades, but the conversation has been reinvigorated in recent years as some Democratic presidential candidates bring the issue to the mainstream, AP writes.

The state of play: Georgetown University and two theological seminaries announced they are paying reparations to the descendants of slaves who were sold or forced to work by the institutions, AP notes.

  • The University of Virginia and at least 56 other universities have pledged to research and share their schools' histories and experiences with slavery.
  • At some schools, the discussion of reparations is brought up by academic professors or graduate students, such as at the University of Alabama and the University of Chicago, per AP.
  • Yale University has erased the names of slavery supporters from its buildings, while other schools like brown University are erecting new statues to commemorate the sacrifice of slaves.

The bottom line: While the process to approve reparations in Congress will be long-winded, individual universities have opted to take the matter in their own hands.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Progressives pressure Schumer to end filibuster

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

A progressive coalition is pressuring Chuck Schumer on his home turf by running a digital billboard in Times Square urging the new majority leader to end the Senate filibuster.

Why it matters: Schumer is up for re-election in 2o22 and could face a challenger, and he's also spearheading his party's broader effort to hold onto its narrow congressional majorities.

4 hours ago - Health

U.S. surpasses 25 million COVID cases

A mass COVID-19 vaccination site at Dodger Stadium on Jan. 22 in Los Angeles, California. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The U.S has confirmed more than 25 million coronavirus cases, per Johns Hopkins data updated on Sunday.

The big picture: President Biden has said he expects the country's death toll to exceed 500,000 people by next month, as the rate of deaths due to the virus continues to escalate.

GOP implosion: Trump threats, payback

Spotted last week on a work van in Evansville, Ind. Photo: Sam Owens/The Evansville Courier & Press via Reuters

The GOP is getting torn apart by a spreading revolt against party leaders for failing to stand up for former President Trump and punish his critics.

Why it matters: Republican leaders suffered a nightmarish two months in Washington. Outside the nation’s capital, it's even worse.