Hundreds of unemployed Kentucky residents wait in long lines outside the Kentucky Career Center for help with their unemployment claims on June 19, 2020, in Frankfort. Photo: John Sommers II/Getty Images

Congress' failure to renew enhanced unemployment measures at the end of July is already showing up in consumer spending patterns, holding down retail purchases and foot traffic, economists at Deutsche Bank say.

What happened: The reduced spending aligns with the expiration of the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation benefits, which provided an additional $600 per week to qualifying unemployed individuals.

  • By mid-June spending by lower-income households had normalized, outpacing spending recoveries for middle- and higher-income consumers thanks to the unemployment benefits, the economists noted.
  • But by the end of the month, consumer spending fell more for lower-income households than others, "no doubt impacted by the sharp decline in unemployment benefits."

Why it matters: "The evaporation of these benefits highlights near-term downside risks to consumer spending, particularly for lower-income households, which have been a critical engine of the recovery despite being disproportionately more likely to lose a job during the pandemic — a testament to the effectiveness of the income supplement."

Major key: Google mobility data indicate that since the end of July foot traffic around retail has declined by more in states that were more likely to be affected negatively by the expiration of unemployment benefits.

Between the lines: Despite President Trump's executive memo extending $400 a week (now looking more like $300/week) in unemployment benefits, "legal, administrative and fiscal uncertainty remains."

A recent study published by the National Bureau of Economic Research found that eliminating the enhanced unemployment benefits would lead to a 44% decline in local spending.

  • Cutting it to $200 would mean a 28% decline in spending.
  • Reducing to $400 would cut spending by 12%.

Go deeper

Fed chair warns economy will feel the weight of expired stimulus

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Fed Chair Jay Powell bump elbows before House hearing on Tuesday. Photo: Joshua Roberts/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell told the House Financial Services Committee on Tuesday that the expiration of Congress' coronavirus stimulus will weigh on the U.S. economy.

Why it matters: Powell warned that the effects of dried-up benefits are a looming risk to the economy, even if the consequences aren't yet visible.

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  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m EST: 6,975,980 — Total deaths: 202,738 — Total recoveries: 2,710,183 — Total tests: 98,481,026Map.
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  4. Health: Cases are surging again in 22 states — New York will conduct its own review of coronavirus vaccine.
  5. Business: America is closing out its strongest quarter of economic growth.
  6. Technology: 2020 tech solutions may be sapping our resolve to beat the pandemic.
  7. Sports: Pac-12 will play this fall despite ongoing pandemic — Here's what college basketball will look like this season.
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Pac-12 will play football this fall, reversing course

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The Pac-12, which includes universities in Arizona, California, Colorado, Oregon, Utah and Washington state, will play football starting Nov. 6, reversing its earlier decision to postpone the season because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: The conference's about-face follows a similar move by the Big Ten last week and comes as President Trump has publicly pressured sports to resume despite the ongoing pandemic. The Pac-12 will play a seven-game conference football season, according to ESPN.

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