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A nurse takes care of a COVID-19 patient in an intensive care unit in Germany. Photo: Rolf Vennenbernd/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

A new UN report on human development makes the case that our species faces a dire future of our own making.

The big picture: The COVID-19 pandemic — which emerged from nature but is in every other way a human-made catastrophe — is the most recent signal that we are firmly in the Anthropocene, a new epoch in which human beings are the most powerful force on the Earth. What comes next is on us.

What's happening: The 2020 Human Development Report — published earlier this week — marks the 30th year the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has assessed the holistic state of humanity.

  • The short version: it's not good, as COVID-19 illustrates the pressures we've put on the planet — pressures that have "grown exponentially over the past 100 years," as UNDP administrator Achim Steiner writes.
  • Beyond the direct costs of the pandemic, COVID-19 has thrown human development into reverse, with social mobility declining and social instability rising.
  • Climate change — the clearest and biggest challenge posed by the Anthropocene — continued its acceleration, with 2020 likely to go down as the hottest year on record.

Of note: The peril and the promise of the Anthropocene are seen most clearly in the case of existential risks, those catastrophic dangers that threaten the future of human civilization.

  • While we've always faced rare but potent cosmic threats like asteroids, today "the dominant risks to its survival come from humanity itself," writes existential risk scholar Toby Ord in the report.
  • But the same power that poses existential risks in the form of nuclear war or bioengineered pandemics means that "humanity’s future is largely within humanity’s control" — provided we're willing to take those risks more seriously than we have to date.

The bottom line: For better or for worse, we'll be the authors of our own future.

Go deeper

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
Dec 16, 2020 - Politics & Policy

The risks and opportunities of 2021 are a mirror image

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A new report — first seen by Axios — lays out what could go wrong in the worlds of geopolitics, business and technology in the coming year, as well as what could go right.

The big picture: Viewed side by side, many of the risks and opportunities of 2021 present a mirror image, where different decisions in the same part of the world can lead to positive outcomes — or another year of catastrophe.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director defends agency's response to pandemic — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden readies massive shifts in policy for his first days in office.
  3. Vaccine: Fauci: 100 million doses in 100 days is "absolutely" doable.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode again.
  5. Tech: Kids' screen time sees a big increase.
  6. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.
Dave Lawler, author of World
3 hours ago - World

Alexey Navalny detained after landing back in Moscow

Navalny and his wife shortly before he was detained. Photo: Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny was detained upon his return to Moscow on Sunday, which came five months after he was poisoned with the nerve agent Novichok. He returned despite being warned that he would be arrested.

The latest: Navalny was stopped at a customs checkpoint and led away alone by officers. He appeared to hug his wife goodbye, and his spokesman reports that his lawyer was not allowed to accompany him.

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