Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: Chesnot/Getty Images

A regulator in Britain could fine Facebook more than $660,000 over the Cambridge Analytica data scandal.

Why it matters: The fine is the first regulatory penalty for the social giant as a result of the data dustup. It may not be the last.

What they’re doing: The British Information Commissioner’s Office said it could fine Facebook 500,000 pounds, the maximum possible, for possible failures in how it handled the collection of data used by Cambridge Analytica. It also said the company might not have properly told users their data could be exposed.

  • Facebook, however, has a chance to respond to the allegations and proposed penalty.

What they’re saying: "As we have said before, we should have done more to investigate claims about Cambridge Analytica and take action in 2015," said Erin Egan, Facebook’s chief privacy officer, in a statement. "We're reviewing the report and will respond to the ICO soon."

Reality check: While it’s the maximum amount allowed under the law, the proposed fine of just over $660,000 likely won't make a large dent in the company's finances. Facebook brought in more than $11 billion in ad revenue during the first quarter of 2018 alone.

The big picture: The office’s investigation will continue. It stretches far beyond Facebook and Cambridge, to other aspects of the use of data in politics.

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Texas and Louisiana face fresh flood threat from Tropical Storm Beta

Tropical Storm Beta slowly approaching the Texas coast on Monday. Photo: National Weather Service/Twitter

Tropical Storm Beta was dumping heavy rains over Texas as it churned its way inland overnight, bringing the risk of "life-threatening storm surge" and flooding to parts of the state and Louisiana, the National Hurricane Center said.

What's happening: The slow-moving storm was causing coastal flooding along areas including the bays near Houston and Galveston in Texas Monday, per the National Weather Service. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) made a disaster declaration and Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) declared a state of emergency Monday.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 31,328,238 — Total deaths: 964,839— Total recoveries: 21,503,496Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 6,857,967 — Total deaths: 199,884 — Total recoveries: 2,615,949 — Total tests: 95,841,281Map.
  3. Health: CDC says it mistakenly published guidance about COVID-19 spreading through air.
  4. Media: Conservative blogger who spread COVID-19 misinformation worked for Fauci's agency.
  5. Politics: House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11.
  6. World: U.K. upgrades COVID alert level as Europe sees worrying rise in infections — "The Wake-Up Call" warns the West about the consequences of mishandling a pandemic.

Louisville police declare state of emergency as Breonna Taylor decision looms

A demonstrator holds up a sign of Breonna Taylor during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

The Louisville police chief declared in a memo obtained by news outlets a "state of emergency" for the department on Monday to prepare for Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's expected announcement on the Breonna Taylor case.

Of note: Louisville has witnessed more than 115 days of protests over the police killing of Taylor, an unarmed Black woman, with calls for all the officers involved to be charged.

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