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Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Uber filed a lawsuit on Friday against New York City to overturn rules limiting the time ride-hail drivers can spend in high-traffic areas, claiming the city's "cruising cap" rule will make it harder for drivers to make money and calling it "a rushed and unlawful process."

What they're saying: Mayor Bill de Blasio stressed in August that the city's e-haling caps "have resulted in increased wages and families finally have some relief." Uber argues drivers' pay will decrease and riders will wait longer.

The big picture: New York City, the Taxi and Limousine Commission and ride-hailing companies like Uber and Lyft have been attempting to reduce vehicle congestion in the city.

  • Ride-hail companies need to cut the average time that drivers cruise passenger-free by 31% within the next year under the new regulations, Crain's reports. Uber said no ride-hail company has ever achieved that type of reduction in cruising rate.

Background: The city's Taxi and Limousine Commission voted unanimously in August to extend the original limitation on the number of licenses that can be issued, and included a “cruising cap" to reduce the number of vehicles that roam throughout the city without passengers.

“While reducing congestion in Manhattan is an important goal—and one Uber has publicly and vocally supported—the August 2019 rule is the product of a rushed and unlawful process, including reliance on flawed and arbitrary economic modeling, which was designed to arrive at a predetermined result that is likely not even feasible."
— Uber said in Friday's court filing

Read the lawsuit

Go deeper: New York judge dismisses Lyft's lawsuit over driver minimum wage

Go deeper

Journalism enters dangerous new era

Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios

The Capitol attack on Jan. 6 resulted in at least nine physical assaults against journalists and at least five arrests, per the U.S. Press Freedom Tracker's top editor.

Why it matters: President Trump's harsh rhetoric towards the press has empowered leaders abroad and locally in the U.S. to continue to attack press that they don't like.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The beginning of the beginning for Biden's climate push

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Joe Biden's inauguration and the days right after will bring a rat-tat-tat burst of climate policy moves, but keep this in mind amid the splashy pledges: pushing through most of his agenda will be a long, uncertain slog.

Why it matters: Biden's climate plan is far more expansive than anything contemplated under President Obama. But for all the immediate pledges, it will take years to see how far Biden gets.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
4 hours ago - Economy & Business

Biden's inflation danger

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President-elect Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion stimulus proposal has economists and bullish market analysts revising their U.S. growth expectations higher, predicting a reflation of the economy in 2021 and possibly more booming returns for risk assets.

Yes, but: Others are warning that what's expected to be reflation could actually show up as inflation, a much less welcome phenomenon.