Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

One intriguing thing to look for in Uber's S-1, whenever it arrives, is how much information it provides about the other ride-hail companies in which it holds shares.

The bottom line: These holdings, particularly in China's Didi Chuxing, could represent a sizable percentage of Uber's proposed market cap. Investors are going to want more than just the latest VC valuations. This also could be where Uber benefits a bit from an IPO for Lyft — assuming it doesn't get taken out first, Qualtrics-style — in that there will be another third-party data point.

Go deeper: Breaking down the Uber-Lyft-Slack IPO rush

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Foreign students could be forced to leave U.S. if colleges move online

Harvard University campus in April 2020. Photo: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Foreign college students could be forced to leave the U.S. or transfer schools if their universities move classes entirely online this fall, according to guidance released by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on Monday.

Why it matters: Several U.S. colleges and universities — most recently Harvard — have announced plans to move most or all courses online this fall due to coronavirus concerns. Many institutions rely heavily on tuition from international students.

Updated 36 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 11,520,461 — Total deaths: 535,453 — Total recoveries — 6,231,052Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 2,911,888 — Total deaths: 130,090 — Total recoveries: 906,763 — Total tested: 35,512,916Map.
  3. Public health: Case growth outpacing testing in hotspots.
  4. States: West Virginia becomes latest state to mandate facial coverings in public.
  5. Politics: Cuomo accuses Trump of "enabling" the coronavirus surge — Sen. Chuck Grassley opts out of attending GOP convention over coronavirus concerns.

Amy Cooper charged for calling police on Black bird-watcher in Central Park

A white woman who called 911 to accuse a Black man of threatening her life in Central Park in March faces misdemeanor charges for making a false report, the Manhattan District Attorney's office announced Monday.

The big picture: The May 25 incident, which was caught on film, was one of several viral episodes that helped catalyze massive Black Lives Matter protests against the police killings of Black people in the U.S.