Uber CEO Travis Kalanick resigns under pressure

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Travis Kalanick, who took a leave of absence last week, resigned as Uber CEO on Tuesday evening. The move, first reported by the New York Times, came after a group of significant investors in the ride-hailing company had been seeking his ouster, as Axios reported earlier on Tuesday night.

What happened: Over the last few months, Uber had been embroiled in a series of controversies, including allegations of sexual harassment and discrimination that triggered a pair of investigations by law firms, and a trade secret theft lawsuit by Alphabet's self-driving car unit. Last week, Uber's board pressured Kalanick's second in the command to resign and fired more than 20 employees following investigations into its workplace issues.

What's next: Kalanick will remain on the board of directors, according to the NY Times, though the company will now have to find his replacement. It also still has to hired a slew of other executives, including a COO and CFO.

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Democratic presidential candidates Sens. Elizabeth Warrenand Sen. Amy Klobuchar at the December 2020 debatein Los Angeles. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine) and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska). Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

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White House counsel Pat Cipollone and acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

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