Jeff Chiu / AP

On Tuesday, Bloomberg published a video recording showing Uber CEO Travis Kalanick arguing with the driver of his Uber Black ride over the company's pricing strategy. The exchange ended with Kalanick suggesting the driver is blaming others for his financial mistakes before exiting the vehicle.

Later on Tuesday, Kalanick sent the following email to the entire company:

Team -By now I'm sure you've seen the video where I treated an Uber driver disrespectfully. To say that I am ashamed is an extreme understatement. My job as your leader is to lead...and that starts with behaving in a way that makes us all proud. That is not what I did, and it cannot be explained away.It's clear this video is a reflection of me—and the criticism we've received is a stark reminder that I must fundamentally change as a leader and grow up. This is the first time I've been willing to admit that I need leadership help and I intend to get it.I want to profoundly apologize to Fawzi, as well as the driver and rider community, and to the Uber team.Travis

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