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Convention Center in downtown Sacramento during the California Democratic State Convention in May 2017. Photo: Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Two men have been charged in connection to an alleged plot to attack the California Democratic Party's headquarters in Sacramento, the FBI said late Thursday.

Driving the news: Ian Benjamin Rogers and Jarrod Copeland were "prompted by the outcome of the 2020 presidential election" and believed their attack would spark a "movement," federal prosecutors said, according to the Washington Post.

The big picture: Copeland was arrested in Sacramento on Wednesday, per the FBI. Rogers was arrested in January on state illegal firearm charges.

  • Law enforcement seized 49 firearms, two dozen ammunition boxes containing rounds of ammunition and five pipe bombs during a January search of Rogers' home, according to court documents.
  • According to the indictment, Rogers sent Copeland a text on Jan. 11 saying: "I want to blow up a democrat building bad."
  • "I’m thinking sac office first target," Rogers then wrote, referring to the offices of California Governor Gavin Newsom in Sacramento.

What they're saying: "The FBI’s highest priority has remained preventing terrorist attacks before they occur, including homegrown plots from domestic violent extremists," Craig Fair, special agent in charge of the FBI’s San Francisco Field Office, said in a statement.

  • "As described in the indictment, Ian Rogers and Jarrod Copeland planned an attack using incendiary devices. The FBI and the Napa County Sheriff’s Office have worked hand-in-hand to uncover this conspiracy and to prevent any loss of life."

Go deeper: ODNI says U.S. faces "heightened threat" from domestic extremism

Go deeper

FBI: Body identified as Gabby Petito, death ruled a homicide

A memorial dedicated to Gabby Petito near City Hall in North Port, Fla. Photo: Octavio Jones/Getty Images

A body found in Teton County, Wyoming, on Sunday was confirmed to be the remains of missing 22-year-old blogger Gabby Petito, the FBI announced Tuesday.

Driving the news: The death was ruled a homicide by the Teton County coroner's office, the FBI said. The cause of death has not been determined.

Mike Allen, author of AM
2 hours ago - Energy & Environment

Laurene Powell Jobs' $3.5 billion climate campaign

Laurene Powell Jobs, president of Emerson Collective, is investing $3.5 billion in her new climate-action group, the Waverley Street Foundation — all to be spent in 10 years, as a way to show urgency on the issue.

  • Then the group will sunset.

The big picture: The foundation "will focus on initiatives and ideas that will aid underserved communities who are most impacted by climate change," an official tells Axios.

R. Kelly found guilty of racketeering and sex trafficking

Photo: Nuccio DiNuzzo/Getty Images

Singer R. Kelly on Monday was found guilty of racketeering and eight counts of violating an anti-sex trafficking law, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Sexual misconduct allegations have surrounded R. Kelly's career, including a child sexual abuse image case in 2008 where he was acquitted. Multiple other victims have come forward to speak about the abuse in recent years.