Photo: Fabian Sommer/picture alliance via Getty Images

Twitter plans to roll out the ability for users to limit who can reply to their tweets with four new options, director of product management Suzanne Xie said at CES in Las Vegas on Wednesday, according to The Verge.

Why it matters: The change marks a departure from Twitter's wide-open approach to online interactions and represents a response to rising discontent with harassment and abuse on the service. Until now, users' control came only in the form of after-the-fact options like blocking other users or, more recently, hiding certain replies to their tweets.

Details: Users sending a tweet will be able to select one of four categories for replies.

  • Global: Anyone can reply.
  • Group: People the user follows and mentions can reply.
  • Panel: Only people mentioned in that tweet itself can reply.
  • Statement: No replies allowed.

Yes, but: Some have pointed out that these new options could make it easier for users to prevent others from countering misinformation or inaccuracies, which users often do by replying to tweets.

  • Xie said that the ability to "quote tweet" (reposting a tweet with one's own commentary) could be an alternative, but that this is “something we’re going to be watching really closely as we experiment.”

Go deeper: Twitter's plans: Follow topics, edit tweets someday

Go deeper

Steve Scalise PAC invites donors to fundraiser at Disney World

Photo: Kevin Lamarque-Pool/Getty Images

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise’s PAC is inviting lobbyists to attend a four-day “Summer Meeting” at Disney World's Polynesian Village in Florida, all but daring donors to swallow their concern about coronavirus and contribute $10,000 to his leadership PAC.

Why it matters: Scalise appears to be the first House lawmakers to host an in-person destination fundraiser since the severity of pandemic became clear. The invite for the “Summer Meeting” for the Scalise Leadership Fund, obtained by Axios, makes no mention of COVID-19.

The coronavirus is ushering in a new era of surveillance at work

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As companies continue to prepare for the return of their employees to the workplace, they're weighing new types of surveillance in the name of safety.

Why it matters: Just as the coronavirus pandemic has acted as an accelerant for the adoption of remote work, it has also normalized increased surveillance and data collection. In the post-pandemic workplace, our bosses will know a lot more about us than they used to.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 6 p.m. ET: 11,712,663 — Total deaths: 540,582 — Total recoveries — 6,381,954Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 6 p.m. ET: 2,981,602 — Total deaths: 131,238 — Total recoveries: 924,148 — Total tested: 36,225,015Map.
  3. 2020: Biden releases plan to strengthen coronavirus supply chain.
  4. Public health: Fauci says it's a "false narrative" to take comfort in lower coronavirus death rate — Deborah Birx: Some Southern states "stepped on the gas" when reopening.
  5. World: Brazil's President Bolsonaro tests positive— India reports third-highest case count in the world.