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Data: FactSet; Chart: Axios Visuals

Twitter shares fell by as much as 12% on Monday after the company announced it had permanently banned President Trump's account.

Between the lines: While many were quick to say the decline was blowback for the company's decision, the performance of other social media companies' stock prices suggests there's more to the story.

On the other side: Snapchat banned the president's account on Wednesday and has seen its stock price jump since, gaining 5.3% on Thursday, 0.6% on Friday and another 3% on Monday.

  • Since banning Trump from its platform Snapchat shares are up 9.2%.
  • Twitter's shares have fallen 9.5% over the same time period, despite not announcing a ban on Trump until Friday after the market closed.
  • Facebook's stock price has declined by about 2.5% during that period, but gained 2.1% on the day it announced it was banning Trump for at least the remainder of his time in office.

The big picture: Twitter's shares have been in decline since hitting a record high of $55.87 on Dec. 18.

  • Still, over the last year Twitter stock has risen by 47%.
  • Facebook's stock has gained around 20%, trailing the overall market.
  • Snapchat is up by 212%, almost entirely since announcing spectacular and unexpected earnings growth last year.

Go deeper

Jan 15, 2021 - Energy & Environment

GM finds love on Wall Street for a change

GM EV600 electric delivery truck. Photo: GM

General Motors is finding love on Wall Street, something it hasn't experienced in a very, very long time.

What's happening: Investors are beginning to give credence to the Detroit automaker's electric vehicle strategy — or they're looking for a cheaper way to participate in the Tesla-inspired run-up in electric vehicle stocks.

Stalemate over filibuster freezes Congress

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Mitch McConnell's inability to quickly strike a deal on a power-sharing agreement in the new 50-50 Congress is slowing down everything from the confirmation of President Biden's nominees to Donald Trump's impeachment trial.

Why it matters: Whatever final stance Schumer takes on the stalemate, which largely comes down to Democrats wanting to use the legislative filibuster as leverage over Republicans, will be a signal of the level of hardball we should expect Democrats to play with Republicans in the new Senate.

Dave Lawler, author of World
2 hours ago - World

Biden opts for five-year extension of New START nuclear treaty with Russia

Putin at a military parade. Photo: Valya Egorshin/NurPhoto via Getty

President Biden will seek a five-year extension of the New START nuclear arms control pact with Russia before it expires on Feb. 5, senior officials told the Washington Post.

Why it matters: The 2010 treaty is the last remaining constraint on the arsenals of the world's two nuclear superpowers, limiting the number of deployed nuclear warheads and the bombers, missiles and submarines which can deliver them.

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