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Jack Dorsey. Photo: Richard Drew / AP

Twitter has been defending its choices not to interfere with Donald Trump's tweets for quite a while now—like it did last week after he retweeted anti-Muslim videos—but many critics are growing frustrated with the company's stance.

What happened: On Wednesday, Trump retweeted anti-Muslim videos posted by Jayda Fransen, the deputy leader of Britain First, an ultranationalist group. Though Twitter originally said that it's not taking down the videos because they are newsworthy and of public interest, it issued a correction the following day, clarifying that it was because the company's policy for media permits them.

Between the lines: A growing number of users are no longer buying the company's excuses for not penalizing Trump for his tweets. Some are even openly asking Twitter and CEO Jack Dorsey whether the real reasons are the company's need to keep Trump using the service (Dorsey denies this), the huge amount of traffic and attention they bring to the service, and because he's the U.S. president, giving him more leeway in what he posts.

Bigger picture: Twitter is caught in a larger debate over what kind of editorial role social networks have in moderating the content their users post on their platforms.

Go deeper

Americans' concern about climate hits all-time highs

The flooded Major Deegan Expressway following a night of heavy rain from remnants of Hurricane Ida on Sept. 2, 2021, in New York City. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

After disaster-filled summer, a record number of Americans are concerned about global warming, according to a new poll from the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication.

Driving the news: The number of Americans who said they are “very” or “somewhat worried” about global warming has reached an all-time high of 70%, the Yale group found as part of a survey it has been conducting since 2008.

Senators to grill top Pentagon leaders over Biden's Afghanistan exit

Photo: Carolone Brehman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, Joints Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Mark Milley, and the head of U.S. Central Command, Gen. Frank McKenzie, are testifying publicly this week for the first time since the chaotic U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan.

Why it matters: The Pentagon's top leaders have come under intense scrutiny over the series of disasters that followed the U.S. exit, including the Taliban's seizure of Kabul, the ISIS-K terrorist attack that killed 13 U.S. service members and scores of Afghans in August, and a retaliatory U.S. drone strike that killed 10 civilians.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Maybe we can ignore inflation expectations

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Just because we expect inflation to show up, doesn't mean it will. That's the message from an important new paper throwing cold water on a central tenet of monetary economics.

Why it matters: The Fed hikes interest rates when — and only when — it thinks inflation is otherwise going to be too high. That means it needs a formula to determine where it thinks inflation is going to be. But now a senior Fed economist is saying that the key ingredient in that formula "rests on extremely shaky foundations."