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Photo by Mehmet Kaman/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Twitter said Wednesday that it nearly doubled its enforcement actions against accounts engaging in abuse and harassment and saw government requests for user information continue to rise in the back half of 2019.

The big picture: The reveals come as Twitter unveils an expansion of its transparency program. Big Tech firms are seeing greater public and political pressure to both crack down on bad behavior and explain their moderation practices.

Details: Twitter locked or suspended 47% more accounts for breaking its rules as compared to the first half of 2019, the company said in a blog post.

  • The company attributed the rise to more human review of potential violations, better reporting tools and more detailed policies on what behavior can trigger an enforcement action.
  • The greatest crackdown came in the categories of nonconsensual nudity as well as abuse and harassment, where account suspensions or bans in both cases roughly doubled. There was a 5% decrease, by contrast, in action over violent threats.

Between the lines: Such disparities may reflect past success in reducing certain types of bad behavior but work that still needs doing on others — or it may reflect Twitter's reviews determining that certain policy categories are a better fit than others for justifying action against an account.

  • A Twitter spokesperson noted that accounts may be reported for one type of behavior but banned or suspended for another.

Yes, but: Because the report only covers the second half of 2019, it doesn't include any data pertaining to the coronavirus pandemic, which has presented new moderation challenges for social media platforms as users flood the internet with misinformation and conspiracy theories.

Meanwhile: Requests for account information from law enforcement and other government bodies rose 21%, with the U.S. continuing to lead the world in requests.

The new stats come with a rebrand and expansion of Twitter's transparency resources. Twitter is launching a new website it's dubbing the Twitter Transparency Center (previously the Twitter Transparency Report) with new data visualizations and tools to let users compare trends over time and across different countries.

What's next: Twitter hopes to deliver the next update to its transparency stats, covering the first half of this year, faster than this one in the interest of getting out coronavirus-related data to the public more quickly.

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
Nov 9, 2020 - Technology

Right-leaning social network Parler tops free app charts

Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Parler, which calls itself a "viewpoint-neutral" social network and is growing popular among conservatives who feel mainstream social platforms are censoring them, is now topping the free app download charts, according to both Apple and Sensor Tower.

Why it matters: With Twitter and other mainstream social media apps more strictly enforcing rules against election-related falsehoods, more permissive, often right-leaning platforms have seen a surge of interest.

Scoop: Gina Haspel threatened to resign over plan to install Kash Patel as CIA deputy

CIA Director Gina Haspel. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

CIA Director Gina Haspel threatened to resign in early December after President Trump cooked up a hasty plan to install loyalist Kash Patel, a former aide to Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), as her deputy, according to three senior administration officials with direct knowledge of the matter.

Why it matters: The revelation stunned national security officials and almost blew up the leadership of the world's most powerful spy agency. Only a series of coincidences — and last minute interventions from Vice President Mike Pence and White House counsel Pat Cipollone — stopped it.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus deaths reach 4,000 per day as hospitals remain in crisis mode — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden says, "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution — Biden taps ex-FDA chief to lead Operation Warp Speed amid rollout of COVID plan — Widow of GOP congressman-elect who died of COVID-19 will run to fill his seat.
  3. Vaccine: Battling Black mistrust of the vaccines"Pharmacy deserts" could become vaccine deserts — Instacart to give $25 to shoppers who get vaccine.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode againFed chair: No interest rate hike coming any time soon —  Inflation rose more than expected in December.
  5. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.