Twitter's daily active user count (not just a percentage of growth) was disclosed for the first time on Thursday: 126 million—or 60 million fewer than Snapchat, and less than a tenth of Facebook's flagship app.

Yes, but: Twitter's 2018 Q4 revenue and earnings beat analyst expectations and posted a profitable full year.

  • The company also specifies that it's disclosing monetizable daily active users, which excludes those using apps that don't display ads like Tweetdeck.

More from Twitter's 2018 Q4:

  • Revenue: $909 million, compared to $868.1 million expected, per Refinitiv.
  • Earnings: adjusted 31 cents, compared to 25 cents expected, per Refinitiv.
  • Monthly active users: 321 million, down from 330 million a year ago. The company will cease to report this metric after 2019 Q1.
  • Monetizable daily active users: 126 million, up 9% from a year ago (though growth has slowed over the past year).

Twitter's stock is down 8.6%, to $31.22, since previous close.

The story has been updated with additional information about Twitter's latest earnings.

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