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Photo: Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

A high court in Turkey ruled Thursday that the government's 2017 ban on Wikipedia is unconstitutional, the New York Times reports.

The big picture: President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan cracked down on freedom of expression in the wake of a failed 2016 coup, banning Wikipedia after the site refused to remove pages that the Turkish government found offensive. Advocates argued that the ban limited access to information and was a violation of free speech, while the government claimed that content on Wikipedia threatened national security.

The Wikimedia Foundation, which runs Wikipedia, said in a statement:

We hope that access will be restored in Turkey soon in the light of this new ruling from Turkey’s highest court and will update this statement if we receive notification that the block has been lifted. We join the people of Turkey, and the millions of readers and volunteers who rely on Wikipedia around the world, to welcome this important recognition for universal access to knowledge.

Of note: The Turkish Constitutional Court previously ruled in 2014 that similar bans on YouTube and Twitter were also violations of freedom of expression.

Go deeper: Internet freedom crumbles as social media becomes tool for autocrats

Go deeper

Texas AG sues Biden administration over deportation freeze

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks to members of the media in 2016. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing the Biden administration in federal district court over its 100-day freeze on deporting unauthorized immigrants, and he's asking for a temporary restraining order.

Between the lines: The freeze went into effect Friday, temporarily halting most immigration enforcement in the U.S. In the lawsuit, Paxton claims the move "violates the U.S. Constitution, federal immigration and administrative law, and a contractual agreement between Texas" and the Department of Homeland Security.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
1 hour ago - Podcasts

Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck

President Biden has said that getting Americans vaccinated for COVID-19 is his administration’s top priority given an initial rollout plagued by organizational, logistical and technical glitches.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the bottlenecks and how to unclog them with Carbon Health chief executive Eren Bali, whose company recently began helping to manage vaccinations in Los Angeles.