Tulsi Gabbard. Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

2020 presidential candidate Rep. Tulsi Gabbard (D-Hawaii) is suing Google for allegedly infringing on her free speech rights after her campaign ads were temporarily suspended following the first round of Democratic primary debates, reports the New York Times.

Why it matters: The lawsuit likely marks the first time a presidential candidate has sued a Big Tech company, according to the Times, and comes amid growing outcry among Republican lawmakers that platforms like Google and Twitter are censoring conservative speech. Gabbard, who identifies as a progressive on most issues, has attracted cross-party attention — including from right-wing outlets like Breitbart and Fox News — as a result of her anti-war message.

  • Gabbard's clash over the war in Afghanistan with fellow candidate Rep. Tim Ryan (Ohio) helped shoot her to the top of Google search rankings after the first debates. Her campaign is alleging that Google suspended her account for 6 hours on June 27 and June 28, stifling her ability to capitalize on the attention spike and raise money.
  • Gabbard is seeking at least $50 million in damages and an injunction to stop Google from "further meddling in the election," per the Times.

Read the full lawsuit:

Go deeper: Tulsi Gabbard on the issues, in under 500 words

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Supreme Court rejects request to extend Wisconsin absentee ballot deadline

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court rejected in a 5-3 decision Monday Wisconsin Democrats' request to reinstate an extension of the deadline for counting absentee ballots to six days after Election Day, as long as they're postmarked by Nov. 3.

Why it matters: All ballots must now be received by 8 p.m. on Election Day in Wisconsin, a critical swing state in the presidential election.

Senate confirms Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court

Judge Amy Coney Barrett before a meeting on Capitol Hill on Oct. 21. Photo: Sarah Silbiger/pool/AFP via Getty Images

The Senate voted 52-48 on Monday to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. She is expected to be sworn in within hours.

Why it matters: President Trump and Senate Republicans have succeeded in confirming a third conservative justice in just four years, tilting the balance of the Supreme Court firmly to the right for perhaps a generation.

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