Trump speaking at World Economic Forum. Photo: Xinhua/Xu Jinquan via Getty Images

Imagine a world without Twitter and "Fox & Friends." Imagine a more restrained President Trump, like we saw onstage in Davos — sans the impulsive and offensive rants against Muslims, immigrants and women.

Be smart: Everything from the 2018 elections to potential impeachment proceedings will be determined by the clash of the two Trump shows.  

We might be talking about a resurgent Golden Age for America:

  • Record low unemployment.
  • Economic growth here and abroad.
  • Economic optimism so strong that Democrats feel better about the economy than they did during the Obama years.
  • Employers handing out bonuses, pay raises and new benefits, thanks to a new spirit of America First for our economy.
  • Companies bringing back jobs and money too long parked overseas.
  • Bank forecasters say a robust 4% growth is possible.

Alas, the other Trump show runs just as hot, often blotting out the other: Special counsel Robert Mueller is picking up more and more evidence of obstruction, with the case looking increasingly ominous — and broad — for POTUS.

  • "At least half a dozen times, President Trump by his actions has invited scrutiny for possible obstruction of justice in the Russia probe." (L.A. Times)
  • "Congressional Democrats ... demanded that lawmakers act to protect ... Mueller ... after revelations President Trump sought to oust him." (WashPost)
  • Sen. Mark Warner, vice chairman of Senate Intelligence: "[F]iring the Special Counsel is a red line that the President cannot cross."
  • "[T]here is likely little that Mueller doesn’t already know about events in the White House. More than 20 White House employees have given interviews to the special counsel's team."(AP)
  • Jeffrey Toobin, for The New Yorker: "Trump’s position looks perilous ... The portrait is of a President using every resource at his disposal to shut down an investigation — of Trump himself. And now it has become clear that Trump’s own White House counsel rebelled at the President’s rationale for his actions."
Subscribe to Axios AM/PM for a daily rundown of what's new and why it matters, directly from Mike Allen.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Server error. Please try a different email.
Subscribed! Look for Axios AM and PM in your inbox tomorrow or read the latest Axios AM now.

Go deeper

Justice Department sues Google over alleged search monopoly

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

The Justice Department and 11 states Tuesday filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, accusing the company of using anticompetitive tactics to illegally monopolize the online search and search advertising markets.

Why it matters: The long-awaited suit is Washington's first major blow against the tech giants that many on both the right and left argue have grown too large and powerful. Still, this is just step one in what could be a lengthy and messy court battle.

Updated 47 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Americans feel Trump's sickness makes him harder to trustFlorida breaks record for in-person early voting.
  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots.
  4. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 5 million infections.

In photos: Florida breaks record for in-person early voting

Voters wait in line at John F. Kennedy Public Library in Hialeah, Florida on Oct. 19. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

More Floridians cast early ballots for the 2020 election on Monday than in the first day of in-person early voting in 2016, shattering the previous record by over 50,000 votes, Politico reports.

The big picture: Voters have already cast over 31 million ballots in early voting states as of Tuesday, per the U.S. Elections Project database by Michael McDonald, an elections expert at the University of Florida.