Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Big tech has been the biggest corporate winner of the Trump presidency, according to an Axios analysis of public-company corporate financials.

Why it matters: The tech giants have spent the past four years facing increased scrutiny from Washington, and Google has even been hit by an antitrust lawsuit. But Google parent Alphabet has seen its profits soar by $12 billion per year since Trump's surprise election in November 2016.

  • That's second only to Apple, whose profits have risen by $13 billion.

How it works: The overarching economic story of the past four years has been the Fed, which cut interest rates to zero and has promised to keep them there indefinitely. The central bank has had much more effect on corporate results than all of Trump's trade wars and campaign promises.

  • Low interest rates make growth companies more valuable, since large future profits are worth more money today.
  • Apple and Amazon both gained more than $1 trillion in market value under Trump. The next biggest gainers are also fast-growing technology stocks: Alphabet, up $500 billion, and Tesla, up more than $300 billion.

The biggest losers are in old-fashioned manufacturing. General Electric and Boeing have both lost $35 billion per year in revenue, while Ford, still in the midst of a drawn-out restructuring effort, is down $20 billion.

  • GE is also one of the biggest losers in terms of market capitalization, along with ExxonMobil and scandal-hit Wells Fargo. All three lost about $200 billion in value even as the broader stock market was soaring.

When it comes to jobs, the fastest-growing employer is again Amazon, which added some 450,000 employees under Trump. But that measure can be deceiving, as companies can decide to move employees on or off their official payroll more or less at will.

  • McDonald's officially lost 170,000 employees over the past four years, for instance, but that's not because fewer people work at its restaurants. It's because the company made a strategic decision at the end of 2015 to slash the proportion of restaurants it runs itself from 19% to 7%.

The bottom line: Both the Fed and the coronavirus have had much more impact on the list of winners and losers than any decisions made in the White House.

  • Trump has been broadly good for corporate America, and healthcare companies in particular have done well under his administration. But fears of Trump picking individual winners and losers have proved largely unfounded.
  • The winners that Trump did try to pick — the coal industry, for example — have often underperformed.

Go deeper

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
Jan 29, 2021 - Economy & Business

The unprecedented stock market craziness, in one chart

Data: Bloomberg; Chart: Sara Wise and Andrew Witherspoon/Axios. Note: Stocks limited to companies with a market capitalization of more than $150 million. 

Almost never does a stock trade more than twice its market value in a single day. It never happened in 2001, for instance, and never happened in 2003, and only happened once in 2002.

Driving the news: It has happened 7 times this week already, and 20 times this month. In the past 12 months, it's happened 84 times, which is more than all of the previous occurrences going back to November 1998.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
Jan 28, 2021 - Economy & Business

How GameStop exposed the market

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Retail traders have found a cheat code for the stock market, and barring some major action from regulatory authorities or a massive turn in their favored companies, they're going to keep using it to score "tendies" and turn Wall Street on its head.

What's happening: The share prices of companies like GameStop are rocketing higher, based largely on the social media organizing of a 3-million strong group of Redditors who are eagerly piling into companies that big hedge funds are short selling, or betting will fall in price.

Mike Allen, author of AM
3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden adviser Cedric Richmond sees first-term progress on reparations

Illustration: "Axios on HBO"

White House senior adviser Cedric Richmond told "Axios on HBO" that it's "doable" for President Biden to make first-term progress on breaking down barriers for people of color, while Congress studies reparations for slavery.

Why it matters: Biden said on the campaign trail that he supports creation of a commission to study and develop proposals for reparations — direct payments for African-Americans.