Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

Even before the recent New York Times bombshell on Trump's taxes, the president's financial entanglements raised the specter of foreign influence.

The big picture: Although Trump has said he turned over day-to-day management of the Trump Organization to his two sons, he hasn't divested from any of his businesses. Revelations from the Times report add to concerns that this state of affairs is shaping elements of Trump's foreign policy.

Catch up quick: National security questions have been raised about:

What's new: The Times report deepens and substantiates this picture, showing that in the president’s first two years in office, "his revenue from abroad totaled $73 million," including "$3 million from the Philippines, $2.3 million from India and $1 million from Turkey" in revenue from licensing deals.

  • It also shows that, in the past, the Trump Organization made over $5 million in a botched hotel deal in Azerbaijan — a project spearheaded by a family with links to Iran’s Revolutionary Guard — and $3 million on a licensing deal for a hotel in the United Arab Emirates.

Trump's business interests in the Philippines, Turkey and India also cloud the relationship between the U.S. and these countries, says Polymeropoulos.

  • "[Philippine President Rodrigo] Duterte and [Turkish President Recep Tayyip] Erdoğan at times act inimical to U.S. interests, yet Trump barely pushes back. And we have tilted decisively toward India under the Trump administration."
  • Even if these policy choices are entirely divorced from Trump’s personal finances, says Polymeropoulos, the “bottom line is that the income just makes anything that happens suspect."

What's next: The post-presidency briefings that will be available to Trump will, among other types of key data, contain highly sensitive economic intelligence, says Wise. "It will give him extraordinary advantages over other competitors."

Go deeper: The national security risks hiding in Trump's debts

Go deeper

Republicans enabled Trump. Then, a few strangled him

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell after the joint session of Congress resumed. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

It is an ironic, poetic ending to the raucous reign of Donald J. Trump: Enabled — and enabling — Republicans put the final knives in their beloved, besieged, beaten president:

  • It was often conservative judges appointed by Trump who rejected his desperate lawsuits to overturn the election results state by state.
Jan 7, 2021 - Technology

The Capitol siege's QAnon roots

Trump supporters outside the Senate chamber. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Wednesday's assault on the U.S. Capitol was an appalling shock to most Americans, but to far-right true believers it was the culmination of a long-unfolding epic.

The big picture: A growing segment of the American far right, radicalized via social media and private online groups, views anyone who bucks President Trump's will as evil. That includes Democrats, the media, celebrities, judges and officeholders — even conservatives, should they cross the president.

In cyber espionage, U.S. is both hunted and hunter

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

American outrage over foreign cyber espionage, like Russia's SolarWinds hack, obscures the uncomfortable reality that the U.S. secretly does just the same thing to other countries.

Why it matters: Secrecy is often necessary in cyber spying to protect sources and methods, preserve strategic edges that may stem from purloined information, and prevent diplomatic incidents.