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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The dollar has fallen every day this week, notching a cumulative loss of around 1% since President Trump complained on Twitter about its strength and took aim at two countries with weak currencies.

Why it matters: The decline may continue, reducing the dollar's strength in 2020, experts say.

Driving the news: With U.S. businesses continuing to complain, Trump has made it clear the currency's strength is a major administration concern.

  • On Monday, he announced he would reimpose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Brazil and Argentina for "presiding over a massive devaluation of their currencies."
  • Trump's decision to target Argentina and Brazil, two countries whose economies have been hurt by weakening currencies and whose central banks have intervened to strengthen them, signals to strategists at Bank of America Merrill Lynch that a number of other countries could find themselves in his crosshairs.

Between the lines: "Trump has the ability to intervene in the FX market," Michelle Meyer, Bank of America Merrill Lynch's head of U.S. economics, tells Axios.

  • "The dollar size would be pretty small in terms of flows but it would be about sending a signal that he is willing to use that tool."

Yes, but: Currency intervention has been shown to be ineffective unless coordinated between central banks, notes Kathy Lien, managing director of FX Strategy at BK Asset Management.

  • "And that’s certainly not what you’re going to get this time around," she tells Axios.

Be smart: What could really move the needle is a ceasefire in the U.S.-China trade war or Trump holding off on instituting more tariffs on Chinese imports.

  • New tariffs have boosted the dollar in the past, Lien says, by prompting traders to sell out of so-called high-beta currencies like the Australian and New Zealand dollars and emerging market currencies, and buy more greenbacks in search of safety.

The dollar also could be weakened by outside factors, Lale Akoner, global market strategist at BNY Mellon, tells Axios.

  • She expects European economic data to improve, bolstering the euro, and for emerging market currencies to rise against the dollar.
  • The British pound has risen to its highest level since May against the dollar this week and could go higher if a Brexit deal is reached, analysts say.

The bottom line: With the U.S. economy poised to slow next year, "the economic differential between the U.S. and the rest of the world will decrease," Akoner says, which should lead to less appetite for the dollar.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

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Photo: Tasos Katopodis via Getty

The incoming Biden administration will reverse President Trump's last-minute order to lift COVID-19 related travel restrictions, Jen Psaki, the incoming White House press secretary, tweeted.

Why it matters: President Trump ordered entry bans lifted for travelers from the U.K., Ireland, Brazil and much of Europe to go into effect Jan. 26, but the Biden administration will "strengthen public health measures around international travel in order to further mitigate the spread of COVID-19," Jen Psaki said. Biden will be inaugurated on Wednesday, Jan. 20 and Trump will no longer be president by the time the order is set to go into effect.

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Dominion Voting Systems on Monday sent a cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell over his spread of misinformation related to the 2020 election.

Why it matters: Trump and several of his allies have pushed false conspiracy theories about the company, leading Dominion to take legal action. It's suing pro-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell for defamation and $1.3 billion in damages, and a Dominion employee has sued Trump himself, OANN and Newsmax.

Off the Rails

Episode 5: The secret CIA plan

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer, Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 5: Trump vs. Gina — The president becomes increasingly rash and devises a plan to tamper with the nation's intelligence command.

In his final weeks in office, after losing the election to Joe Biden, President Donald Trump embarked on a vengeful exit strategy that included a hasty and ill-thought-out plan to jam up CIA Director Gina Haspel by firing her top deputy and replacing him with a protege of Republican Congressman Devin Nunes.