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Trump talks to reporters . Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Members of the media are speaking out after President Trump launched a series of attacks on the press referring to them as an "enemy of the people."

Why it matters: Trump has long been critical of the mainstream media, but going so far as to call the media an "enemy of the people" is meant to fire up his base and further stoke distrust of the reporters he often clashes with.

Following attacks on CNN White House correspondent Jim Acosta at President Trump's Tampa rally earlier this week, members of the media are condemning threats of violence — including Fox News' Sean Hannity — as hostility against the press is quickly escalating.

In his opening remarks Wednesday evening, Hannity — a confidante of Trump  came to Acosta's defense: "I will be the first person to come to your defense if I’m there and anyone ever dares lay a hand on you. If I was standing there, if I see it happen, I will be the first person to jump in and fight on your behalf. Physical violence is never acceptable to me, nor is it acceptable to the conservatives I know and respect."

  • However, he then quickly returned to standard criticism of CNN and biased media.

During Axios' Thursday interview with the president's daughter, Ivanka, Axios' Mike Allen asked if she agreed with her father that the press is in fact, an enemy of the people. She said she doesn’t.

Later Thursday, Acosta pressed White House press secretary Sarah Sanders to say "the press is not an enemy of the people." She refused, instead citing cases where the media has attacked her personally and "resorts to personal attacks without any content other to incite anger."

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Go deeper: Where Trump's enemy of the people attack originated

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
22 mins ago - Energy & Environment

Japan vows deeper emissions cuts ahead of White House summit

Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga. Photo: Carl Court/Getty Images

Japan on Thursday said it will seek to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 46% below 2013 levels by 2030, per the AP and other outlets.

Why it matters: The country is the world's fifth-largest largest carbon dioxide emitter and a major consumer of coal, oil and natural gas.

54 mins ago - Technology

The global race to regulate AI

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Regulators in Europe and Washington are racing to figure out how to govern business' use of artificial intelligence while companies push to deploy the technology.

Driving the news: On Wednesday, the EU revealed a detailed proposal on how AI should be regulated, banning some uses outright and defining which uses of AI are deemed "high-risk."

Biden pledges to cut greenhouse gas emissions by up to 52% by 2030

U.S. President Joe Biden seen in the Oval Office on April 15. (Photo by Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images)

The Biden administration is moving to address global warming by setting a new, economy-wide greenhouse gas emissions reduction target of 50% to 52% below 2005 levels by 2030.

Why it matters: The new, non-binding target is about twice as ambitious as the previous U.S. target of a 26% to 28% cut by 2025, which was set during the Obama administration. White House officials described the goal as ambitious but achievable during a call with reporters Tuesday night.