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Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

House Majority Whip Steve Scalise is in critical condition after being shot in the hip at a Congressional baseball practice in Alexandria Virginia, MedStar Hospital in Washington announced:

"The bullet travelled across his pelvis, fracturing bones, injuring internal organs, and causing severe bleeding. He was transported in shock to MedStar Washington Hospital Center, a Level I Trauma Center. He underwent immediate surgery, and an additional procedure to stop bleeding. He has received multiple units of blood transfusion. His condition is critical, and he will require additional operations."

President Trump visited the hospital Wednesday evening. The man suspected of shooting Scalise and four others is dead. Earlier, Trump thanked the Capitol Police for preventing more injuries and added:

"We may have our differences, but we do well, in times like these, to remember that everyone who serves in our nation's capital is here because, above all, they love our country."

Those injured: Scalise, Zachary Barth, Matt Mika and Spec. Agt. Crystal Griner were shot. A second officer and congressman sustained "secondary injuries." The victims were at a practice for an upcoming charity baseball game. The shooting suspect was identified as James Hodgkinson, 66, of Bellville, Illinois.

The latest, via the FBI's Timothy Slater: "While the subject is deceased we continue to actively investigate the shooter's motives, acquaintances and whereabouts that led to this incident." The suspect's home in Illinois is being searched. He is believed to have been living in his car in Alexandria since March.

Eyewitness reports:
  • Rep. Roger Williams released a statement, saying a member of his staff was shot at the baseball practice as well.
  • Rep. Ron DeSantis (R-Fla.) said on Fox & Friends that he left the field shortly before the shooting, and said Scalise had been shagging ground balls at second base. DeSantis said he had reported to authorities "an encounter with someone who wanted to know whether they were Republicans or Democrats." DeSantis said he didn't know if it was the shooter.
  • Rep. Mo Brooks described the shooting on CNN, saying there were more than 50 shots fired. "The gun continued to fire."
  • Sen. Rand Paul said on Fox that there was a rapid succession of shots, and that he saw Scalise "trying to drag himself through the dirt." He added, "I think we're lucky that Scalise was there because this was his security detail, without them it would have been a massacre."
  • Sen. Jeff Flake said on CBS, "There was firing behind us from the security detail...we didn't know if there were other shooters that had us surrounded."
  • Rep. Brad Wensrup used his belt to stop Scalise's bleeding. He told CBS News, "I felt like I was back in Iraq as a surgeon."
  • Rep. Mike Bishop said, according to the Daily Beast, "He was coming around the fence line and he was looking for all of us who had found cover in different spots. But if we didn't have return fire right there, he would have come up to each one of us and shot us point-blank."
  • Rep. Mark Walker told NBC News, "Shaken but OK. Gunman was there to kill as many Republican members as possible."
  • Rep. Joe Barton told CBS that he hid in the dugout when shots started and his 10-year-old son hid under an SUV.

Go deeper

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As the pandemic forces students out of school, broadband deployment programs aren't going to move fast enough to help families in immediate need of better internet access. But Democrats at the Federal Communications Commission say the incoming Biden administration could put a dent in that digital divide with one fast policy change.

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President-elect Biden faces a fragile recovery that could easily fall apart, as the economy remains in worse shape than most people think.

Why it matters: There is a recovery happening. But it's helping some people immensely and others not at all. And it's that second part that poses a massive risk to the Biden-Harris administration's chance of success.