Sam Baker Feb 5
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Trump slams "universal health care," which he once praised

President Trump criticized Democrats this morning for wanting “universal health care,” citing the ongoing problems with Britain’s National Health Service. Funding shortfalls at the NHS have led to such long delays that some patients are being turned away from hospitals.

Yes, but: Universal coverage means everyone’s covered; it’s not necessarily the same thing as a single-payer health care system like the NHS. And it’s a goal Trump has repeatedly endorsed in the past.

What he's said before:

  • May 2017: Trump told Malcolm Turnbull, the Australian prime minister, that “you have better health care than we do.” (Australia has a single-payer system.)
  • January 2017: “We’re going to have insurance for everybody,”
  • September 2015: "Everybody's got to be covered … I am going to take care of everybody. I don't care if it costs me votes or not."
  • 2000: “I’m a conservative on most issues but a liberal on health … We must take care of our own. We must have universal healthcare.”

Reality check: In most of the world, single-payer — in which the government provides all or most health insurance, and in some cases directly employs health care providers —is the route to achieving universal coverage.

  • Such systems are indeed financed with high taxes.
  • But even countries with generous single-payer systems spend far less per person, in total, than the U.S. spends each year on health care. (Per-capita health care spending in the U.S. is more than double what the U.K. spends — we just don't spend it all through taxes.)

Go deeper: Jeremy Hunt, the U.K.'s health secretary, strikes back at Trump.

Haley Britzky 2 hours ago
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DOJ eyeing tool to allow access to encrypted data on smartphones

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

The Justice Department is in "a preliminary stage" of discussions about requiring tech companies building "tools into smartphones and other devices" that would allow law enforcement investigators to access encrypted data, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: This has been on the FBI's mind since 2010, and last month the White House "circulated a memo...outlining ways to think about solving the problem," officials told the Times. Both FBI Director Christopher Wray, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, support finding ways for law enforcement to access data without compromising devices security.

Haley Britzky 2 hours ago
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Media tycoon Barry Diller talks #MeToo

 IAC & Expedia, Inc. Chairman & Senior Executive Barry Diller
IAC & Expedia, Inc. Chairman & Senior Executive Barry Diller. Photo: Cindy Ord / Getty Images for Yahoo

Barry Diller, chairman of mega-media and Internet company IAC, told the New York Times he thinks "all men are guilty," when it comes to "the spectrum" of the #MeToo movement.

"I hope in the future for some form of reconciliation. Because I think all men are guilty. I’m not talking about rape and pillage. I’m not talking about Harveyesque. I’m talking about all of the spectrum. From an aggressive flirt. Or even just a flirty-flirt that has one sour note in it. Or what I think every man was guilty of, some form of omission in attitude, in his views."

Why it matters: The #MeToo movement has rocked Hollywood and the media industry. Diller told the Times he sees the effects of this "in our companies, where the relationships between people are changing."