Aug 28, 2019

Trump and nuking hurricanes: The aftermath

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

President Trump tweeted on Tuesday night — for the third time — that Jonathan Swan's reporting on him asking if officials could explore using nuclear bombs to stop hurricanes from hitting the U.S. was ridiculous. 

Why it matters: We stand solidly behind our reporting. Before publishing, we gave the White House full visibility on the key details of our story, and more than nine hours to deny or push back against our reporting.

  • The article is meticulously sourced. 
  • Since we published, additional sources have corroborated our account.
  • The president made these comments in at least two separate meetings during his first 14 months in office. And on at least one occasion, they were memorialized in a National Security Council memo.

Between the lines: We go out of our way to cover Trump clinically, without emotion or bias.

  • We go the extra mile in all our stories to never throw sucker punches, and always give the Trump White House precise details of our reporting in advance, and ample time to respond. 
  • We have found Trump officials accessible, even when we report things they want kept secret.
  • We will continue this approach because we think it best serves all of you. 

Go deeper: Inside Trump’s fake news recidivism

Go deeper

New Google rules aim to boost original reporting in search results

Photo by Aytac Unal/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Google said Thursday that it has recently adjusted its algorithms and the guidelines used by the people that rate its search results to elevate original reporting.

Why it matters: The moves aim to provide an incentive for news organizations to focus on fresh reporting as opposed to quick aggregation of other news reports.

Go deeperArrowSep 12, 2019

Bolton's chaotic White House departure

President Donald Trump and former National Security Advisor John Bolton. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

The last time National Security Adviser John Bolton spoke with President Donald Trump was Monday afternoon around 2 p.m. in the Oval Office — offering to resign — about 22 hours before the president's Tuesday tweet suggesting that he had fired Bolton, according to a person familiar with the situation. 

Why it matters: The timeline contradicts the president's account and speaks volumes about how Trump runs his administration.

Go deeperArrowSep 11, 2019

Report: Trump ordered Ukraine aid freeze days before call to its leader

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump directed his acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney to withhold nearly $400 million in military aid for Ukraine days before he phoned the country's president and allegedly urged him to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden's son, the Washington Post and New York Times report.

Details: The White House told Axios that the reports, published late Monday, are "completely false." WashPost reported that officials in the administration's Office of Management and Budget notified the Pentagon and State Department about the request at an interagency meeting in July.

Go deeperArrowSep 24, 2019