Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Just under 6,200 people attended President Trump's rally in Tulsa Saturday, well below the BOK Center's total capacity of 19,200, a public information officer for the Tulsa Fire Department told Forbes Sunday.

Why it matters: Trump's campaign had planned to turn the rally into a massive pro-Trump festival to energize his re-election bid amid the coronavirus pandemic and nationwide protests against police brutality. Campaign manager Brad Parscale tweeted last week that 800,000 people had signed up to attend the rally.

What they're saying: The campaign is still celebrating the rally, saying in a press release that it attracted "over 4 million unique viewers across all of the campaign’s digital media channels" and 2.5 million livestreams before the start of the rally.

  • "The news media, which encouraged protestors and bombarded Americans for more than a week with dire warnings against attending a Trump rally, are still unable to prevent President Trump from reaching the people," campaign spokesperson Tim Murtaugh said.
  • "These numbers represent unmatched enthusiasm behind the President’s re-election and a massive audience that Joe Biden can only dream of.”

A Trump campaign official disputed the Tulsa Fire Department's figure on Sunday, claiming the campaign counted "12,000" people.

  • The official did not clarify if that was the exact number of attendees or an estimate.

Go deeper: Trump cranks up culture war rhetoric at first rally since pandemic

Editor's note: This story has been updated to include that the Trump campaign disputes TFD's estimate.

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Biden campaign using Instagram to mobilize celebrity supporters

Collins appears on the BUILD live interview series in November 2019. Photo: Gary Gershoff/Getty Images

The Biden campaign is launching a new initiative today that will draft Hollywood celebrities for Instagram Live chats with campaign officials and other Biden supporters.

Why it matters: The campaign, called #TeamJoeTalks, is an attempt to open up a new front on social media, drawing on celebrities’ Instagram followers to help find and motivate voters while large parts of the country remain locked down.

Biden releases plan to strengthen coronavirus supply chain

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden's campaign released a three-part plan Tuesday to rebuild U.S. supply chains in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, and it's centered around the idea that the country is more vulnerable to global disruptions in spite of President Trump's "America First" rhetoric.

Why it matters: Biden is proposing a way to make sure the U.S. doesn't rely on other countries for personal protective equipment (PPE) and other related medical supplies. That's another way of acknowledging that we're not getting over this health crisis anytime soon.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

The major police reforms that have been enacted since George Floyd's death

NYPD officers watch a George Floyd protest in Manhattan on June 6. Photo: Scott Heins/Getty Images

Nationwide Black Lives Matter protests sparked by George Floyd's killing have put new pressure on states and cities to scale back the force that officers can use on civilians.

Why it matters: Police reforms of this scale have not taken place in response to the Black Lives Matter movement since its inception in 2013, after George Zimmerman's acquittal for shooting Trayvon Martin, an unarmed Black teenager.