Jun 7, 2017

Trump to nominate Christopher Wray to lead FBI

Lawrence Jackson / AP

President Trump announced on Twitter Wednesday morning that he is nominating Christopher Wray, George W. Bush's assistant attorney general, to be the new FBI Director.

Timing: Trump's announcement comes a day before former FBI Director James Comey is set to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Essential details on Wray:

  • He served during George W. Bush's administration as the former chief of the Justice Department's criminal division, from 2003-2005.
  • He "was a member of the administration's Corporate Fraud Task Force and oversaw the fraud prosecutions of former executives at Enron Corp," per USA Today.
  • He left the Justice Department in 2005 to work as a litigation partner at the King & Spalding law firm.
  • He was Chris Christie's personal lawyer during the Bridgegate scandal, and he has represented various Fortune 100 companies.

How the White House is reacting: Officials are relieved he chose someone other than Joe Leiberman, who previously took himself out of the race. There was concern at top levels of the administration that doing so would have only added to the firestorm because of his firm's connection

The caveat to watch:

How it's playing:

  • Norm Eisen, a frequent Trump critic: "[W[ray is a good choice..."
  • Matthew Miller, former spokesman to Eric Holder: "Wray probably the best choice from the WH short list. His record in the Bush DOJ deserves scrutiny, but he's a serious, respectable pick."

The Trump surprise?

What's next: Trump must formally nominate Wray, who has to be approved by the Senate. The administration has been slow on the nominations process.

Go deeper: Trump's Comey conundrum

Go deeper

Facebook employees stage "virtual walkout"

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

"Dozens" of Facebook employees staged a "virtual walkout" Monday over the company's decision not to take action against President Trump's provocative messages in the face of nationwide protests against police violence, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: While Twitter added fact-check labels and hid the president's most inflammatory tweet — "when the looting starts, the shooting starts" — Facebook has said Trump's statements do not violate its policies, and that the platform aims to promote free speech.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

Updated 16 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump lashes out at governors, urges them to "dominate" protesters

President Trump berated the nation’s governors in a video teleconference call Monday, calling many of them "weak" and demanding tougher crackdowns on the protests that erupted throughout the country following the killing of George Floyd, according to multiple reports.

The big picture: Trump blamed violence on the "the radical left" and told the governors, who were joined by law enforcement and national security officials, that they have to "dominate" protesters and "arrest people" in order to bring an end to the unrest.

Updated 16 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Noam Galai, Jamie McCarthy, Josep Lago/AFP, Alfredo Estrella/AFP, and Narayan Maharjan/NurPhoto, all via Getty Images

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 6,206,773 — Total deaths: 372,752 — Total recoveries — 2,661,643Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 1,793,780 — Total deaths: 104,3450 — Total recoveries: 444,758 — Total tested: 16,936,891Map.
  3. Public health: Fauci says“My meetings with the president have been dramatically decreased” — Coronavirus looms over George Floyd protests across the country.
  4. Climate: Your guide to comparing climate change and coronavirus.
  5. Economy: A busy week for IPOs despite upheaval from protests and pandemic.
  6. World: Former FDA commissioner says "this is not the time" to cut ties with WHO.