President Trump at the 2020 Council for National Policy Meeting on August 21. Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals on Friday denied President Trump's request to immediately delay his financial records from being turned over to a New York state grand jury, pushing the hearing until September 1.

Driving the news: Trump's request came in response to a federal judge dismissing the president's lawsuit on Thursday to block Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance's subpoena for his records — the latest clash in a battle that went to the Supreme Court last month.

  • Trump's lawyers filed an emergency request on Thursday for the court to hold a subpoena for his accounting records and tax returns until the higher court can decide on the matter.

The big picture: The Supreme Court ruled in July that presidents are not immune from investigation, denying Trump the sweeping grant of presidential power he had asked for while trying to block access to eight years of his personal and corporate tax returns.

What to watch, per the AP: The federal appeals' court decision potentially leaves the Supreme Court as Trump's "most promising option" to block the subpoena.

Go deeper: Judge throws out Trump's effort to block subpoena for financial records

Go deeper

Sep 24, 2020 - Technology

Senate panel plans subpoena vote for Google, Facebook, Twitter CEOs

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Senate Commerce Committee plans to hold a subpoena vote to compel testimony from the top executives of Google, Facebook and Twitter for a hearing next month, the panel announced Thursday.

Why it matters: The subpoena threat is the latest move by lawmakers to pare back the tech industry's prized liability shield, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act.

Trump prepares to announce Amy Coney Barrett as Supreme Court replacement

Judge Amy Coney Barrett. Photo: Matt Cashore/Notre Dame University via Reuters

President Trump is preparing to nominate federal appeals court Judge Amy Coney Barrett of Indiana, a favorite of both the social conservative base and Republican elected officials, to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Republican sources tell Axios.

Why it matters: Barrett would push the already conservative court further and harder to the right, for decades to come, on the most important issues in American politics — from abortion to the limits of presidential power. If confirmed, she would give conservatives a 6-3 majority on the high court.

House Democrats propose 18-year term limits for Supreme Court justices

The flag-draped casket of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lies in repose at the Supreme Court. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

House Democrats are set to introduce a bill next week that would impose 18-year term limits on future Supreme Court justices, allowing a president to nominate two justices during each term in office.

The big picture: The bill, sponsored by Reps. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.), Don Beyer (D-Va.) and Joe Kennedy III (D-Mass.), seeks to depoliticize the process of placing new justices on the court — a fight that has taken on new light after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg last week.

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