Jan 24, 2020

Trump's Space Force gets a new, recognizable logo

Space Force vs Starfleet. Photo: Trump Twitter feed (left)/CBS/Viacom (Right)

The Trump administration's new Space Force logo looks a lot like another space visual: the Star Trek insignia.

Why it matters: The United States Space Force was signed into law at the end of 2019 after President Trump directed the Pentagon to form a new branch of the military dedicated to keeping U.S. assets in space safe.

Between the lines: The Space Force logo is also a play on the Air Force Space Command's logo.

The big picture: Proponents of the Space Force say that the U.S. has fallen behind other nations that have put resources behind weaponizing space.

  • By standing up the Space Force, experts claim that it could help deter further weaponization of space and keep military assets safe in orbit.
  • Yes, but: Others say that a Space Force simply places undue emphasis on the militarization of space instead of focusing on keeping it a peaceful realm.

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SpaceX inks deal to fly space tourists to orbit

NASA astronaut Suni Williams inside a mockup of a Crew Dragon capsule. Photo: SpaceX

SpaceX has penned a deal with the space tourism outfit Space Adventures to launch private citizens to orbit aboard the company's Crew Dragon capsule.

Why it matters: SpaceX is building and testing the Crew Dragon to fly astronauts to the International Space Station, but this announcement shows they're thinking about orbital space tourism as a possible driver of revenue for them in the future.

Go deeperArrowFeb 18, 2020 - Science

Astronaut snaps a view of the lights of the aurora from orbit

Photo: NASA

Looking down on the lights of the aurora from above is something very view people have had the chance to experience.

The intrigue: This photo, taken by an astronaut onboard the International Space Station, gives those of us bound to Earth's surface a taste of what the view from space is like.

Go deeperArrowJan 28, 2020

The big business of tracking junk in space

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Thousands of pieces of space junk are speeding around Earth, but current tracking tools aren't yet able to pinpoint where most of the junk is at any given time, putting other satellites in danger — and fueling a growing industry to track debris and satellites.

Why it matters: Trackers warn collisions can knock out communications, cause millions of dollars in damage, and add to the price of insurance and therefore operation.

Go deeperArrowFeb 4, 2020 - Science