Feb 26, 2017

"Trump slump" in U.S. tourism

Interest in traveling to the U.S. has dropped 17% since Trump's inauguration, according to Hopper, an app for tracking flight price quotes. Hopper tracks between ten billion and fifteen billion airfare price searches every day.

Data: Hopper Research; Methodology: Comparing the weekly average flight searches to the U.S. on Hopper during Dec. 29, 2016 - Jan. 18, 2017 and Jan. 26 - Feb. 1, 2017; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

Why this matters: International tourism to the U.S. is calculated as an export, so this could increase our trade deficit, which will irk Trump, according to Quartz. Right now, San Francisco, Baltimore, Las Vegas, and Los Angeles airports are the most affected. This is also an indication that there may be fewer tourists visiting restaurants, museums, and landmarks.

A notable exception: Travel interest from Russia is way up at 88%.

It's not normal: There was only a 1.8% decline in interest this time last year, meaning the dip in interest now is not seasonal.

It's not just the travel ban: Interest was already declining in the three weeks building up to the inauguration, and data from 94 of 122 countries indicates a diminished interest in traveling to the U.S.

Go deeper

Deficit balloons to $356.6 billion in first quarter of fiscal year

Photo: Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images

The U.S. budget deficit hit $356.6 billion in the first quarter of fiscal year 2020, up 11.8% compared to the same period the previous year, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: The deficit, which President Trump pledged in 2016 to eliminate within eight years, is on pace to exceed $1 trillion by the end of 2020. The U.S. has not seen $1 trillion annual deficits since the three years that followed the 2008 financial crisis, per the New York Times.

Go deeperArrowJan 13, 2020

Audit report: Tokyo Olympics likely to cost more than $12.6 billion

The National Stadium, venue for the upcoming Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. Photo: Behrouz Mehri/AFP via Getty Images

Japan's National Audit Board released a report on Friday suggesting the Tokyo Olympics is likely to cost $9.7 billion in addition to the $12.6 billion that organizers are claiming the event's price tag will be, AP reports.

Why it matters: Only $5.6 billion in private money is allocated to fund the Olympics. The remainder of the funds will come from taxpayers across the country, the city of Tokyo and other government bodies, according to AP.

Go deeperArrowDec 21, 2019

What you need to know about the 2020 presidential candidates, in under 500 words

Read up on the candidates who have announced their runs for president to learn about their backgrounds and criticisms and see where they stand on key issues.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Jan 13, 2020 - Politics & Policy