Nov 21, 2019

Trump signs short-term spending bill to stave off government shutdown

Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

President Trump on Thursday, just hours before the midnight deadline to shut down the government, signed a short-term measure funding the government through Dec. 20, the Washington Post reports.

The big picture: The House passed the measure earlier this week, and the Senate approved it on Thursday. The measure sets another shutdown deadline days before Congress breaks for the end-of-year holidays. Congress and Trump will have only four weeks to work through disputes over border wall funding and to agree on broader spending bills.

Go deeper: U.S. budget gap hits $134.5 billion, up 34% in a year

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Congress reaches tentative spending deal to stave off government shutdown

Nita Lowey. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Democratic and Republican negotiators in the House and Senate reached a deal "in principle" to fund the federal government through the rest of the 2020 fiscal year, House Appropriations Chair Nita Lowey (D-N.Y.) confirmed Thursday.

Why it matters: A looming Dec. 20 funding deadline had lawmakers fearing another government shutdown, which would come into effect days after the House is set to vote on articles of impeachment. Details of the $1.3 trillion spending deal are still being hammered out, but a vote in the House is expected to be scheduled for Tuesday.

Keep ReadingArrowDec 12, 2019

Federal deficit sees 12% increase in two months, topping $342 billion

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The federal deficit hit $342 billion for the first two months of fiscal year 2020, according to new Congressional Budget Office estimates.

The big picture: The annual deficit is forecast to average $1.2 trillion a year between 2020 and 2029, about 4.4% to 4.8% of gross domestic product, according to the CBO. Meanwhile, the national debt exceeded $23 trillion in November.

Go deeperArrowDec 10, 2019

House Judiciary Committee approves articles of impeachment against Trump

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee approved two articles of impeachment against President Trump — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — on Friday.

Why it matters: The party-line 23-17 votes, which were delayed after a marathon markup hearing on Thursday lasted until almost midnight, completes the House committees' impeachment work and advances the articles to the House chamber for a full floor vote next week.

Go deeperArrowDec 13, 2019