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President Trump waving to the press. Photo: Oliver Douliery-pool/Getty Images

President Trump tweeted that he has the "absolute right" to pardon himself in any investigation on Monday morning after personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani argued he "probably does" have the right to do so.

The big picture: Some legal experts are blasting the president for suggesting that he'd be able to pardon himself and some are saying that there are ways he could pardon himself or be pardoned.

What they're saying
  • Trump administration counselor Kellyanne Conway appeared on Fox News and said it doesn't matter whether Trump can pardon himself:
"To ask whether President Trump will pardon himself is a ridiculous question because you would only pardon yourself if you’ve done something wrong."
  • Senator Chuck Grassley told CNN Trump needs to find a new lawyer:
"If I were president of the United States and I had a lawyer that told me I could pardon myself, I think I would hire a new lawyer."
  • In a tweet, Senator Richard Blumenthal said Trump pardoning himself would be "unthinkable":
"Only in a two-bit tin horn totalitarian dictatorship could the President even consider pardoning himself from all accountability. "
  • Senator Ed Markey looked to a DOJ ruling for clarity on the issue and said Trump can't pardon himself in a tweet:
"'Under the fundamental rule that no one may be a judge in his own case, the President cannot pardon himself,' – DOJ Office of Legal Counsel, 4 days before Nixon resigned."
  • House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy said Trump never explicitly said that he'd pardon himself. He also added he doesn't think a president should ever pardon themselves:
"The president is not saying he is going to pardon himself. The president never said he pardoned himself...I don't think a president should pardon themselves."
  • Paula Reid of CBS said Trump isn't able to pardon himself based on a DOJ ruling, but Vice President Mike Pence can.

Go deeper: What we know about Trump's self-pardon power.

Go deeper

Biden Cabinet confirmation schedule: When to watch hearings

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris on Jan. 16 in Wilmington, Delaware. Photo: Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

The first hearings for President-elect Joe Biden's Cabinet nominations begin on Tuesday, with testimony from his picks to lead the departments of State, Homeland and Defense.

Why it matters: It's been a slow start for a process that usually takes place days or weeks earlier for incoming presidents. The first slate of nominees will appear on Tuesday before a Republican-controlled Senate, but that will change once the new Democratic senators-elect from Georgia are sworn in.

Kamala Harris resigns from Senate seat ahead of inauguration

Vice President-elect Kamala Harris. Photo: Mason Trinca/Getty Images

Vice President-elect Kamala Harris submitted her resignation from her seat in the U.S. Senate on Monday, two days before she will be sworn into her new role.

What's next: California Gov. Gavin Newsom has selected California Secretary of State Alex Padilla to serve out the rest of Harris' term, which ends in 2022.

4 hours ago - World

Putin foe Navalny to be detained for 30 days after returning to Moscow

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny. Photo: Oleg Nikishin/Epsilon/Getty Images

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny has been ordered to remain in pre-trial detention for 30 days, following his arrest upon returning to Russia on Sunday for the first time since a failed assassination attempt last year.

Why it matters: The detention of Navalny, an anti-corruption activist and the most prominent domestic critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, has already set off a chorus of condemnations from leaders in Europe and the U.S.