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President Trump on his cellphone in June. Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Trump told Barstool Sports founder Dave Portnoy in an interview released Friday that he sometimes has regrets about his tweets and retweets.

Why it matters: Throughout his presidency, Trump has faced bipartisan criticism for his controversial comments on Twitter. He has also tested tech platforms' willingness to crack down on abuse and misinformation he spreads on his social media accounts.

  • The president has more than 84 million Twitter followers.

What he's saying: "It used to be in the old days before this, you'd write a letter, and you'd say, 'This letter is really good.' You put it on your desk and then you go back tomorrow and you say, 'Oh, I'm glad I didn't send it,'" Trump said.

  • "But we don't do that with Twitter, right? We put it out instantaneously, we feel great. And then you start getting phone calls, 'Did you really say this?'"
  • "It's not the tweets. It's the retweets that get you in trouble. You see something that looks good, and you don't investigate it."

Flashback: Twitter in late May said that a Trump tweet in which he threatened shooting in response to civil unrest in Minneapolis violated the company's rules.

  • The move exacerbated tensions between the social media giant and the president over the company's authority to label or limit his speech and, conversely, the president's authority to dictate rules to a private company.

Go deeper: Twitter flags Trump tweet for violating rules on abusive behavior

Go deeper

Acting DHS chief calls on Twitter to "commit to never" censoring content

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf. Photo: Greg Nash-Pool/Getty Images

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf sent a letter to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey on Friday, calling on him to "commit to never again censoring content" on the platform.

Driving the news: U.S. Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Mark Morgan said on Thursday the platform locked his account and removed a tweet about the effectiveness of the border wall.

Updated Nov 1, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trump on supporters' caravan surrounding Biden campaign bus: "I love Texas!"

President Trump posted video Saturday night of his supporters surrounding a Biden-Harris campaign bus with the comment, "I LOVE TEXAS!" in a tweet Democrats called "reckless."

Why it matters: Democratic officials and witnesses said the pro-Trump vehicles attempted to "force" the Biden-Harris campaign bus "off the road" in the incident on Friday, per the New York Times.

Trump's coronavirus adviser Scott Atlas resigns

Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty

Scott Atlas, a controversial member of the White House coronavirus task force, handed in his resignation on Monday, according to three administration officials who discussed Atlas' resignation with Axios.

Why it matters: President Trump brought in Atlas as a counterpoint to NIAID director Anthony Fauci, whose warnings about the pandemic were dismissed by the Trump administration. With Trump now fixated on election fraud conspiracy theories, Atlas' detail comes to a natural end.

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