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President Trump. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Trump administration agreed to share data on the Paycheck Protection Program, a nearly $700 billion coronavirus aid program, with Congress but not the American public, AP reports.

Why it matters: As Democratic lawmakers have argued for transparency, ethics watchdogs say access to the detailed data on the taxpayer-funded loans will allow them to see who has received help and who hasn't, per AP.

The state of play: Senior administration officials will be providing information on nearly 4.7 million loans worth $515 billion, per AP. The Small Business Administration has only shared general information so far, such as where the businesses are located or the industry they fall into.

  • The administration has maintained that because PPP loans are calculated based on payroll data, employers may see that information as competitively sensitive or proprietary, AP notes.
  • The Treasury Department and SBA announced plans last week to release the names of some businesses that received $150,000 or more in PPP loans. Data on loans under $150,000 will only be shared with Congress.

Yes, but: Officials warned lawmakers not to provide any of the "confidential" loan information to the public.

Go deeper: Paycheck Protection Program borrowers get more flexibility

Go deeper

Sep 15, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus unveils $2 trillion coronavirus bill

Rep. Josh Gottheimer joined by other members of the Problem Solvers Caucus, unveils the March to Common Ground proposal, Sept. 15. Photo: Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

A bipartisan group of 50 House members known as the Problem Solvers Caucus unveiled a roughly $2 trillion coronavirus stimulus bill on Tuesday amid frustration with congressional and White House leaders for failing to deliver desperately needed aid to Americans.

Why it matters: The legislation, which is widely viewed as unpassable, is a last-ditch effort by centrist lawmakers to force party leaders back to the negotiating table before the November election.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: WHO: AstraZeneca vaccine must be evaluated on "more than a press release."
  2. Politics: McConnell temporarily halts in-person lunches for GOP caucus.
  3. Economy: Safety nets to disappear in DecemberAmazon hires 1,400 workers a day throughout pandemic.
  4. Education: U.S. public school enrollment drops as pandemic persists.
  5. Cities: Surge in cases forces San Francisco to impose curfew — Los Angeles County issues stay-at-home order, limits gatherings.
  6. Sports: NFL bans in-person team activities Monday, Tuesday due to COVID-19 surge — NBA announces new coronavirus protocols.
  7. World: London police arrest more than 150 during anti-lockdown protests — Thailand, Philippines sign deal with AstraZeneca for vaccine.

Tony Hsieh, longtime Zappos CEO, dies at 46

Tony Hsieh. Photo: FilmMagic/FilmMagic

Tony Hsieh, the longtime ex-chief executive of Zappos, died on Friday after being injured in a house fire, his lawyer told the Las Vegas Review-Journal. He was 46.

The big picture: Hsieh was known for his unique approach to management, and following the 2008 recession his ongoing investment and efforts to revitalize the downtown Las Vegas area.

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