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Photo: Tom Brenner-Pool/Getty Images

House Oversight Committee Chair Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.) introduced a bill on Tuesday designed to counter President Trump's "politicization of the Postal Service" on Tuesday.

Why it matters: The bill follows Postmaster General Louis DeJoy's combative testimony before Maloney's committee on Monday, where he testified that he would not reverse the operational changes that have reportedly caused widespread mail delays ahead of the 2020 election.

  • DeJoy, a Republican megadonor and Trump ally, denied that he was seeking to "sabotage" mail-in voting ahead of the election, as Democrats have alleged.
  • He previously said he would suspend the changes — which he said were already in motion before he took office — until after the election in order to avoid even the appearance of impropriety.

The state of play: If the bill passes, it would prohibit the Postal Service Board of Governors, the Postmaster General and the Deputy Postmaster General from holding any political position while in office.

  • It would also restrict nominees to those who have not engaged in political activities in the four years leading up to their appointment.

What they're saying: "As we heard at our hearing yesterday, both of these officials are longtime Republican operatives, fundraisers, and mega-donors, and they are overt about their efforts to help Donald Trump win in November," Maloney said in a statement, referring to DeJoy and Postal Service Board of Governors chair Robert Duncan.

  • "In so many areas, including the Postal Service, the Census Bureau, and the Justice Department, President Trump is fundamentally degrading the longstanding independence of our core constitutional functions to his own political ends right before our eyes."

Of note: The House voted on Saturday to give the USPS $25 billion and to block and reverse the operational changes that are leading to widespread mail delays.

  • 26 Republicans supported the measure, but the bill is unlikely to move forward after a White House veto threat.

Go deeper

Nov 22, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Inside Republicans' troubled Election Day operations

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As President Trump unsuccessfully argues fraudulent voter claims, campaign operatives tell Axios the reality is the joint EDO (Election Day operations) by the Trump campaign and Republican National Committee left them feeling largely unprepared to challenge ballots in real time.

Why it matters: With several states moving toward certifying election results this week, the postmortems are beginning as political operatives try to understand what worked, what didn't and how to adjust going forward.

Inaugural address: Biden vows to be "a president for all Americans"

Moments after taking the oath of office, President Joe Biden sought to soothe a nation riven by political divisions and a global pandemic, while warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country and defeat a "virus that silently stalks the the country."

Why it matters: From the same steps that a pro-Trump mob launched an assault on Congress two weeks earlier, the new president paid deference to the endurance of American political institutions.

Updated 52 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden and Vice President Harris review readiness of military troops, a long-standing tradition to signify the peaceful transfer of power.