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Marine One carries President Trump away from the White House on Inauguration Day. Photo: Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Donald Trump's still-active presidential campaign committee officially disavowed political groups affiliated with the nascent "Patriot Party" on Monday.

Why it matters: Trump briefly floated the possibility of creating a new political party to compete with the GOP — with him at the helm. But others have formed their own "Patriot Party" entities during the past week, and Trump's team wants to make clear it has nothing to do with them.

What's happening: Donald J. Trump for President Inc., the former president's official campaign committee, filed a notice with the Federal Election Commission officially distancing itself from a new Patriot Party PAC.

  • "DJTFP is placing this disavowal notice on the public record out of concern for confusion among the public, which may be misled to believe that Patriot Party's activities have been authorized by Mr. Trump or DJTFP — or that contributions to this unauthorized committee are being made to DJTFP — when that is not true," the committee wrote.

What we're hearing: In a statement to Axios prior to Monday's filing, Trump spokesperson Jason Miller said his team has nothing to do with that group or any similar effort.

  • “We are not supportive of this effort, have nothing to do with it and only know about it through public reporting," Miller said in a text message.

Trump briefly floated the possibility of creating — and leading — an alternative political party to compete with the GOP.

  • While he quickly dropped the idea, a host of groups have sprung up lately promoting the "Patriot Party" brand.

The Patriot Party group the Trump campaign disavowed was just one of a handful to file paperwork with the FEC in recent days.

  • It falsely stated in FEC paperwork that it had a joint fundraising agreement with the Trump campaign committee.
  • Another group formed on Monday, the MAGA Patriot Party National Committee, also claimed, falsely, to have a similar agreement.

Go deeper

The week the Trump show ended

Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Donald Trump was eclipsed in media attention last week by President Biden for the first time since Trump took office, according to viewership data on the internet, on social media and on cable news.

Why it matters: After Trump crowded out nearly every other news figure and topic for five years, momentum of the new administration took hold last week and the former president retreated, partly by choice and partly by being forced off the big platforms.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Here come Earmarks 2.0

DeLauro at a hearing in May 2020. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The House Appropriations Committee is preparing to restore a limited version of earmarks, which give lawmakers power to direct spending to their districts to pay for special projects.

Why it matters: A series of scandals involving members in both parties prompted a moratorium on earmarks in 2011. But Democrats argue it's worth the risk to bring them back because earmarks would increase their leverage to pass critical legislation with a narrow majority, especially infrastructure and spending bills.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
2 hours ago - Energy & Environment

UN says Paris carbon-cutting plans fall far short

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Nations' formal emissions-cutting pledges are collectively way too weak to put the world on track to meet the Paris climate deal's temperature-limiting target, a United Nations tally shows.

Driving the news: This morning the UN released an analysis of the most recent nationally determined contributions (NDCs) — that is, countries' medium-term emissions targets submitted under the 2015 pact.