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Expand chart
Data: Trump Executive Order and Axios reporting. Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Delivering on a promise he made at Mount Rushmore this summer, President Trump yesterday released his 244 candidates for a "National Garden of American Heroes."

By the numbers: Men outnumber women nearly four to one (192 to 52). 86 of the nominees, nearly a third, were born between 1900 and 1950. 

The first person born was Christopher Columbus, in 1451.

  • Last born was Kobe Bryant, in 1978.
  • Most recent death was Alex Trebek.

Oldest was NASA mathematician Katherine Johnson at 101.

  • Youngest was Nathan Hale, the Revolutionary War soldier and spy who was executed by the British at 21.

Axios asked historian Michael Beschloss, whose Twitter feed is a gusher of fascinating period photos, for his view of the list:

No president of the United States or federal government has any business dictating us citizens who our historical heroes should be. This is not Stalin’s Russia.
Any American who loves democracy should make sure there is never some official, totalitarian-sounding "National Garden of American Heroes," with names forced upon us by the federal government.
The glory of American democracy is that every one of our citizens decides who his or her personal heroes are. That is not the prerogative of any president, especially one rejected by American voters and who is on his way out the door.
Many of the people on this list of "heroes" would be embarrassed to be singled out by someone like Donald Trump.
If "the heroes of 1776 have been desecrated," as Trump claims, that desecration was done by champions of authoritarianism who attacked American democracy, culminating in the January 6 attack on the U.S. Congress and Capitol — and by the president who has incited them.
If "the brave warriors who saved freedom from Nazi fascism have been disgraced," as Trump claims, that was done by the 45th president, who praised Nazis, racists, anti-Semites and their sympathizers after the Charlottesville attacks of 2017.

Go deeper

Republican Sen. Sasse slams Nebraska GOP for "weird worship" of Trump after state party rebuke

Sen. Ben Sasse, (R-Neb.) Photo: Andrew Harnik - Pool/Getty Images

The Nebraska Republican Party on Saturday formally "rebuked" Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) for his vote to impeach former President Trump earlier this year, though it stopped short of a formal censure, CNN reports.

Why it matters: Sasse is the latest among a slate of Republicans who have faced some sort of punishment from their state party apparatus after voting to impeach the former president. The senator responded statement Saturday, per the Omaha World-Herald, saying "most Nebraskans don't think politics should be about the weird worship of one dude."

Cuomo barraged by fellow Dems after second harassment accusation

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo faced a barrage of criticism from fellow Democrats after The New York Times reported that the second former aide in four days had accused him of sexual harassment.

Why it matters: Cuomo had faced a revolt from legislators for his handling of nursing-home deaths from COVID. Now, the scandal is acutely personal, with obviously grave political risk.

3 hours ago - Health

Fauci: Children "very likely" to get COVID vaccine at start of 2022

NIAID Director Anthony Fauci. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Children under age 12 will "very likely" be able to get vaccinated for coronavirus at the "earliest the end of the year, and very likely the first quarter of 2022," NIAID Director Anthony Fauci told "Meet the Press" Sunday.

Why it matters: Children generally aren't at risk of serious coronavirus infections, but vaccinating them will be key to protecting the adults around them and, eventually, reaching herd immunity, writes Axios' Caitlin Owens.