Mulvaney and Meadows in the East Room of the White House on Feb. 6. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

President Trump announced on Friday that he will replace acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney with Rep. Mark Meadows (R-N.C.)

Why it matters via Axios' Alayna Treene: Meadows recently announced his plans to retire from Congress, and hinted at a job in the Trump administration. Trump trusts Meadows, and has appreciated his fierce and public loyalty over the past years.

Yes, but: The role under Trump has been minimized, with the president preferring to operate as his own chief of staff.

Details: Mulvaney will become the U.S. special envoy for Northern Ireland, Trump tweeted on Friday.

Flashback: Trump previously floated the idea of installing Meadows in the role in 2018, as a replacement for former White House chief of staff John Kelly.

What he's saying:

"It's an honor to be selected by President Trump to serve alongside him and his team. This President and his administration have a long list of incredible victories they've delivered to the country during this first term, with the best yet to come—and I look forward to helping build on that success and staying in the fight for the forgotten men and women of America.
In particular, I want to recognize my friend Mick Mulvaney. Mick is smart, principled, and as tough a fighter you'll find in Washington, D.C. He did a great job leading the President's team through a tremendous period of accomplishment over the last year plus.
— Rep. Mark Meadows wrote in a Friday evening statement

Go deeper: Rep. Mark Meadows to retire in 2020

Go deeper

U.S. economy added 4.8 million jobs in June

Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Chart: Axios Visuals

The U.S. economy added 4.8 million jobs last month, while the unemployment rate dropped to 11.1% from 13.3% in May, according to government data released Thursday.

The state of play: While the labor market showed more signs of recovery when the government’s survey period ended in early June, the lag means that more recent developments, like the surge in coronavirus cases and resultant closures in some states, aren't captured in this data.

1.4 million Americans filed for unemployment last week

Photo: Wang Ying/Xinhua via Getty Images

Another 1.4 million Americans filed for unemployment last week, the Department of Labor announced Thursday.

Why it matters: New applications for unemployment remain historically high, suggesting layoffs are still widely prevalent. However, they remain well below the all-time record seen when the coronavirus pandemic first hit.

The crushing budget blow awaiting state and local government workers

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

State and local government jobs are being gutted, even as the labor market shows signs of a slight recovery.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic blew a hole in state and local government budgets. A slew of states cut spending and jobs — with more planned layoffs announced this week as states try to balance budgets.