Dec 3, 2019

Impeaching Trump is unpopular in key election states

Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Polls in key 2020 states show that support for impeaching President Trump is lower than in national impeachment polls, according to an analysis by the Washington Post.

Why it matters: The polls signal that pursuing impeachment could potentially hurt Democrats in states they need to carry to defeat Trump in his bid for a second term.

By the numbers: In a dozen October and November polls on impeachment in battleground states like Arizona, Florida, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina and Wisconsin, an average of 44% of those surveyed supported impeachment, with 51% opposed, according to the Post.

  • In averages of national polls, 47% of respondents said they support impeachment, while 43% said they oppose it.
  • After strongly opposing impeachment in the summer, national polls since the start of the House' public hearings have independent voters divided on the subject, with 42% in support and 44% opposed.

Between the lines: Trump's approval rating has also remained steady in national polling throughout the impeachment inquiry hearings, swaying between 39% and 43% from mid-September to mid-November, according to Gallup polling.

  • The lack of movement in Trump's approval ratings demonstrates how entrenched Americans are in their opinion of Trump. News and congressional testimony about his actions have not significantly changed how people feel about the president.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Poll: Public opinion is split on impeachment after hearings

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

A poll conducted by SSRS for CNN shows that public opinion on President Trump's impeachment is split and remains unchanged from October.

Why it matters: Only half of the 1,007 respondents said they believe Trump should be impeached and removed from office over his handling of military aid to Ukraine and 43% said he should not, despite five days of public hearings in House Democrats' impeachment inquiry.

Go deeperArrowNov 26, 2019

House Judiciary Committee hears impeachment evidence

Photo: Anna Moneymaker/Pool/Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee heard the evidence behind the impeachment inquiry on Monday in a marathon nine-and-a-half hour hearing.

Why it matters: The committee is likely only days away from drafting formal articles of impeachment against President Trump — and this hearing was one of House Democrats' last chances to summarize their case against the president to the public.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Dec 9, 2019

The normalization of impeachment

Data: Sources, compiled with the help of the House Historian's Office: “A Petition for Presidential Impeachment”; “The House Impeaches Andrew Johnson”; “Origins and Development of the House: Impeachment”; Hinds Precedents, Volume 3; The Age of Impeachment; Congress.gov; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

If the House votes next week to impeach President Trump, some lawmakers warn that impeaching presidents could become the new normal. Historians and constitutional experts say it won't go that far — but they do concede a drift in that direction.

Why it matters: If impeachment loses its taboo to become just another partisan instrument with implications for elections and fundraising, that would weaken its power as an emergency mechanism and further polarize Republicans and Democrats.

  • This is what's happened to government shutdowns, Supreme Court fights and filibusters.
Go deeperArrowDec 13, 2019