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Hospitals are fighting regulations that would force them to disclose negotiated prices. Photo: Rob Kim/Getty Images

The Trump administration unveiled a new proposal Monday, in which privately negotiated prices between hospitals and private health insurers would inform how Medicare pays for future health care services.

Yes, but: Hospitals are suing over the original price transparency regulation, so this proposal would get thrown in the trash if hospitals win in court.

Details: Last year, Medicare finalized a rule that required all hospitals to publicize the prices they negotiated with insurance companies by 2021. 

  • Hospitals immediately sued, saying the rule was unconstitutional and federal overreach. They just asked a federal judge to throw out the rule.
  • However, Medicare is still moving forward with this new proposal, which builds on last year's rule and would require hospitals to list the median commercial prices on federal reports.
  • By 2024, Medicare would then use those prices to "develop market-based" payments.

The bottom line: This entire proposal is a long way from happening, and more importantly hinges on whether the courts believe the federal government has the authority to require hospitals to publish all of their prices.

Go deeper

Judge blocks Trump admin rollback of transgender health protections

A couple wave a pride flag in San Francisco. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A federal judge issued a preliminary injunction Monday preventing the Trump administration from enforcing a new regulation that would rescind Obama-era health care protections for transgender people.

Why it matters: The Department of Health and Human Services' rule reversing protections established under the Affordable Care Act was due to take effect on Tuesday.

Aug 18, 2020 - Health

The U.S. didn't learn its lesson on nursing homes

Data: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Chart: Axios Visuals

Coronavirus cases in nursing homes surged in late July, according to new data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Why it matters: Despite all the rhetorical focus on better protecting vulnerable seniors, long-term care facilities continue to be a major source of community spread in the U.S.

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.