Nov 16, 2018

The number of uninsured Americans holds steady under Trump

Expand chart
Data: CDC; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Overall, the number of Americans who don’t have health insurance is holding pretty steady under President Trump. The uninsured rate stood at 12.5% in the first half of this year, according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The big picture: Most of those people should be eligible for Medicaid if their states expanded, or for heavily subsidized ACA coverage. That’s in line with where it’s been since the Affordable Care Act’s coverage expansion began in 2014.

Although coverage has expanded significantly across the board, the CDC’s report offers a good snapshot of who’s still uninsured.

By the numbers: Being uninsured is often temporary. About 17% of people said they had been without coverage for part of the year, compared with 7% who had been uninsured for over a year.

  • A quarter of the people who were uninsured at the time the CDC interviewed them were Hispanic; 14% were black, 9% were Asian and 7% were white.
  • People between the ages of 18 and 24 were more likely to be uninsured than older or younger adults.
  • Unsurprisingly, poor people still lack health care coverage — 25% of uninsured adults in the CDC’s survey had incomes at or below the poverty line.
  • Another 25% were “near poor," meaning their household income was less than roughly $25,000 for an individual, or $50,000 for a family of 4.

Go deeper

State and local officials fight to keep Medicaid for inmates

Angola prison in Louisiana. Photo: Giles Clarke/Getty Images

Some local and state officials want Medicaid to start picking up the tab for inmates' health care, Stateline reports.

How it works: Medicaid beneficiaries lose their coverage while they're incarcerated — including pretrial detention for people who can't make bail — and county governments are generally responsible for providing their care.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020

Health policy in 2020 will be made in the states

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

With legislation in Congress likely to be blocked by partisan division and interest group opposition, much of the real action in health care this year will be in the states.

The big picture: States don’t have the money or purchasing power the federal government does, but their decisions nevertheless affect millions of people, and they could signal the future of federal reform.

Go deeperArrowJan 6, 2020

America's heart disease epidemic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Americans are increasingly dying of heart disease and strokes as they hit middle age — and the trend is happening across the country, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of mortality rates.

Why it matters: It suggests "that the underlying causes of cardiovascular disease are universal and difficult to address," the Journal found.

Go deeperArrowJan 14, 2020