Apr 24, 2017

Trump gets facts wrong on DNC cybersecurity company

Susan Walsh / AP

President Trump told the Associated Press that a cybersecurity company hired by the Democratic National Committee to examine last summer's hacks is based in Ukraine and "owned by a very rich Ukranian." Neither claim is true.

From the AP transcript:

TRUMP: Why wouldn't (former Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John) Podesta and Hillary Clinton allow the FBI to see the server? They brought in another company that I hear is Ukrainian-based.
AP: CrowdStrike?
TRUMP: That's what I heard. I heard it's owned by a very rich Ukrainian, that's what I heard. But they brought in another company to investigate the server. Why didn't they allow the FBI in to investigate the server? I mean, there is so many things that nobody writes about. It's incredible.

The facts: CrowdStrike actually is based in Irvine, California. Its major shareholders are U.S.-based venture capital firms, including one affiliated with Google. Another investor is Warburg Pincus, a private equity firm that used to employ Trump economic advisor Kenneth Juster.

CrowdStrike's reply: The company says that it assumes Trump's comment is in reference to CrowdStrike co-founder and chief technology officer Dmitri Alperovitch, who is an American citizen of Russian heritage.

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