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Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

In a series of Wednesday morning tweets, President Trump blasted a lawsuit from New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood that led to the Trump Foundation's dissolution as a personal attack instead of a credible legal challenge, calling it "a total double standard of 'justice.'"

The big picture: Media reports have alleged that Trump used funds from the now-shuttered foundation to pay for hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal costs among other extravagant personal expenditures. Trump has continuously denied the allegations since they first arose in late 2016, claiming "100% of money goes to wonderful charities."

How it happened: The Washington Post's David Fahrenthold first reported in September 2016 that Trump had spent $20,000 of the foundation's money to purchase a portrait of himself at a Mar-a-Lago auction.

  • Fahrenthold followed up with another report that Trump used $258,000 from the foundation to settle legal disputes regarding his businesses, including Mar-a-Lago, and purchased another portrait of himself for $10,000.
  • New York's then-Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced an investigation into the foundation around the same time, stating that it "may have engaged in some improprieties."
  • Following his 2016 election win, Trump said he wanted to dissolve the foundation to avoid any appearance of conflict of interest, but the attorney general’s office refused, stating that doing so would require the its approval given the ongoing investigation.
  • Underwood, Schneiderman's successor, filed the lawsuit in June 2018 alleging the foundation was used for "unlawful political coordination" with the Trump campaign to benefit Trump's personal and business interests.

That led to Tuesday's decision that saw the foundation agree to dissolve in compliance with Underwood's lawsuit. The foundation’s remaining $1.75 million will be distributed to other charities approved by Underwood's office and a state judge.

What to watch: Underwood's office has said it will continue to pursue its lawsuit, which ultimately seeks $2.8 million in restitution and bans for Trump and his adult children, who also served on the foundation's board, from serving on other New York non-profit boards.

Go deeper: The 17 know Trump-related investigations

Go deeper

25 mins ago - Health

U.S. exceeds 100,000 COVID-related hospitalizations for the first time

People wait outside the Emergency room of the Garfield Medical Center in Monterey Park, California on Dec 1. Photo: Frederic J. Brown/Getty Images

More than 100,200 Americans were hospitalized as of Wednesday due to the coronavirus for the first time since the outbreak began in early 2020, per the COVID Tracking Project.

The big picture: The milestone comes as health officials anticipated cases to surge due to holiday travel and gatherings. The impact of the holiday remains notable, as many states across the country are only reporting partial data.

4 hours ago - Science

The "war on nature"

A resident stands on his roof as the Blue Ridge Fire burned back in October in Chino Hills, Calif. Photo: Jae C. Hong/AP

Apocalyptic weather is the new normal because humans are "waging war on nature," the UN declared on Wednesday.

What they're saying: "The state of the planet is broken," said UN Secretary-General António Guterres, reports AP. “This is suicidal.”

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Health: Nursing homes are still getting pummeledU.S. could hit herd immunity by end of summer 2021 if Americans embrace virus vaccines, Fauci says.
  2. Politics: Pelosi, Schumer call on McConnell to adopt bipartisan $900B stimulus framework.
  3. World: U.K. clears Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine for mass rollout — Putin says Russia will begin large-scale vaccination next week.
  4. Business: Investors are finally starting to take their money out of safe-haven Treasuries.
  5. Sports: The end of COVID’s grip on sports may be in sight.