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Photo: Pier Marco Tacca/Getty Images

The Department of Health and Human Services this week blocked the Food and Drug Administration's ability to regulate lab-developed tests, including for the coronavirus, that have been produced by hundreds of hospitals.

What they're saying: The change prohibits the FDA from overseeing such tests before they're marketed without a detailed rule-making process. HHS said it is taking the action as part of broader Trump administration review of "duplicative actions and unnecessary policies."

Why it matters: As the U.S. struggles to manage COVID-19 testing, the policy shift has public health experts surprised and worried that it could lead to unreliable coronavirus tests making their way onto the market, the Washington Post notes, adding the FDA opposed the change.

  • Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. (D-NJ), chair of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which oversees the FDA, called the decision “deeply concerning and suggests that the Trump administration is once again interfering with FDA’s regulation of medical products.”
  • The FDA argued that a number of cases, including some flawed tests for Lyme disease and heart conditions, show why the lab industry must be regulated.

The other side: Supporters said the change, announced Wednesday, could allow innovative tests to reach the public more efficiently, and countered that the FDA's process slowed testing at the start of the pandemic. Advocates further argue that the FDA doesn't have the authority to regulate lab-developed tests.

Between the lines: This move serves as an example of "health agencies [having] been undercut by political overseers," The Post writes.

Flashback: Early in the outbreak, critics said the FDA was too slow and bureaucratic in its review process of lab-developed coronavirus tests.

  • But starting in late March, the FDA told hospitals they could make tests without prior FDA approval, adding medical centers could use their tests and the agency would assess after the fact.

The impact: The tests most affected by the latest policy are those used at labs regulated by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments program, which is overseen by HHS's Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Such labs are found in academic medical centers, smaller commercial labs and organizations including Quest and LabCorp.

The bottom line: "The FDA regulation of laboratory-developed tests has long been a gray area," the Post writes.

Go deeper

Nov 28, 2020 - Health

NFL bans in-person team activities Monday, Tuesday due to COVID-19 surge

Houston Texans play the Detroit Lions in Detroit on Thanksgiving Day. Photo: Amy Lemus/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The NFL said it will prohibit all in-person team activities on Monday and Tuesday to help curb the spread of the coronavirus among teams.

Driving the news: The move comes "in response to the continuous increase in positivity rates throughout the country” and because “a number of players and staff celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday with out-of-town guests," NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said in a memo late on Friday, per the NFL Network's Tom Pelissero.

Updated Nov 29, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: WHO: AstraZeneca vaccine must be evaluated on "more than a press release."
  2. Politics: McConnell temporarily halts in-person lunches for GOP caucusColorado Governor and partner test positive.
  3. Economy: Safety nets to disappear in DecemberAmazon hires 1,400 workers a day throughout pandemic.
  4. Education: U.S. public school enrollment drops as pandemic persists.
  5. Cities: Surge in cases forces San Francisco to impose curfew — Los Angeles County issues stay-at-home order, limits gatherings.
  6. Sports: NFL bans in-person team activities Monday as crisis engulfs league, Tuesday due to COVID-19 surge — NBA announces new coronavirus protocols.
  7. World: London police arrest more than 150 during anti-lockdown protests — Thailand, Philippines sign deal with AstraZeneca for vaccine.
Nov 28, 2020 - Health

U.S. public school enrollment drops as pandemic persists

Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

Public schools across the country are seeing a drop in enrollment numbers as schools have shifted to remote and hybrid learning programs to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic, the New York Times reports.

The state of play: Some parents are opting to keep their children at home or finding models that provide in-person coursework.

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