Jul 10, 2017

Trump delays — and plans to eliminate – foreign founder visas

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

The Department of Homeland Security has delayed the effective date of the International Entrepreneur Rule. The official notice of the delay will be published in the federal register on Tuesday, according to the Federal Register website. The Trump administration also signaled its intent to ultimately eliminate the rule.

  • The rule, put into place in the waning days of the Obama administration, would have allowed foreign entrepreneurs to come to the U.S. to start companies. Read more about it here and here. The July 17 effective date has been postponed until March 14, 2018.
  • National Venture Capital Association Bobby Franklin said the move "represents a fundamental misunderstanding of the critical role immigrant entrepreneurs play in growing the next generation of American companies."
  • U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services said in a statement that it decided to delay the rule to ensure it is consistent with the a January executive order requiring DHS to ensure parole authority — or permission to remain in the U.S. for a limited period of time under certain circumstances — is exercised only on a case-by-case basis.
  • "During the delay, DHS will be soliciting public comment on a proposal to withdraw to the rule, and individuals will not be able to apply for parole under the International Entrepreneur Rule," USCIS said in the statement.

This post has been updated to include USCIS's statement.

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  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 857,487 — Total deaths: 42,107 — Total recoveries: 178,034.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in confirmed cases. Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 188,172 — Total deaths: 3,873 — Total recoveries: 7,024.
  3. Business updates: Should you pay your rent or mortgage during the coronavirus pandemic? Find out if you are protected under the CARES Act.
  4. Public health updates: More than 400 long-term care facilities across the U.S. report patients with coronavirus — Older adults and people with underlying health conditions are more at risk, new data shows.
  5. Federal government latest: President Trump said the next two weeks would be "very painful," with projections indicating the virus could kill 100,000–240,000 Americans.
  6. U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt: Captain of nuclear aircraft carrier docked in Guam pleaded with the U.S. Navy for more resources after more than 100 members of his crew tested positive.
  7. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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World coronavirus updates: UN warns of recession with "no parallel" to recent past

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

The novel coronavirus pandemic is the "greatest test" the world has faced together since the formation of the United Nations just after the Second World War ended in 1945, UN chief António Guterres said Tuesday.

The big picture: COVID-19 cases surged past 856,000 and the death toll exceeded 42,000 Tuesday, per Johns Hopkins data. Italy reported more than 12,000 deaths.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Health

White House projects 100,000 to 240,000 U.S. coronavirus deaths

President Trump said at a press briefing on Tuesday that the next two weeks in the U.S. will be "very painful" and that he wants "every American to be prepared for the days that lie ahead," before giving way to Deborah Birx to explain the models informing the White House's new guidance on the coronavirus.

Why it matters: It's a somber new tone from the president that comes after his medical advisers showed him data projecting that the virus could kill 100,000–240,000 Americans — even with strict social distancing guidelines in place.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 3 hours ago - Health