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President Trump and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Photo: Peter Nicholls/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

The Trump administration laid out its case against a Senate bill that would sanction Turkey for purchasing Russian-made defense systems and help Syrian Kurdish refugees immigrate to the U.S. in a State Department document obtained by The Daily Beast.

Why it matters: The document reveals how Turkey's actions have divided Trump officials and members of Congress, who have criticized the executive branch for not sanctioning Turkey for trading with Russia's defense and intelligence sectors.

  • The bipartisan "Promoting American National Security and Preventing the Resurgence of ISIS Act" — sponsored by Sens. Jim Risch (R-Idaho) and Bob Menendez (D-N.J.) — would bar the U.S. from selling Turkey F-16 or F-35 fighter jets unless the country abandons the Russian-made S-400 missile defense system it has purchased and tested. 

The big picture: In the document, the administration argues that the legislation would damage defense trade between the U.S. and Turkey, pushing Turkey to buy more weapons from Russia or other "adversary arms providers."

  • The administration says the legislation would "treat Turkey as a pariah in NATO, feeding a narrative that the Russian Federation would likely seek to amplify and exploit."

The administration also opposes a provision of the bill that would help Kurdish allies immigrate to the U.S.

  • "The President has been clear on this Administration’s approach to refugees as reflected in the National Security Strategy of the United States," the document says.
  • The administration has already capped the number of refugees the U.S. will accept at a historic low of just 18,000 from a high of 110,000 in 2016.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris sat down with CNN on Thursday for their first joint interview since the election.

The big picture: In the hour-long segment, the twosome laid out plans for responding to the pandemic, jump-starting the economy and managing the transition of power, among other priorities.

The quick FCC fix that would get more students online

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As the pandemic forces students out of school, broadband deployment programs aren't going to move fast enough to help families in immediate need of better internet access. But Democrats at the Federal Communications Commission say the incoming Biden administration could put a dent in that digital divide with one fast policy change.

State of play: An existing FCC program known as E-rate provides up to $4 billion for broadband at schools, but Republican FCC chairman Ajit Pai has resisted modifying the program during the pandemic to provide help connecting students at home.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
34 mins ago - Politics & Policy

America's hidden depression

Biden introduces his pick for Treasury secretary, Janet Yellen, on Dec. 1. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President-elect Biden faces a fragile recovery that could easily fall apart, as the economy remains in worse shape than most people think.

Why it matters: There is a recovery happening. But it's helping some people immensely and others not at all. And it's that second part that poses a massive risk to the Biden-Harris administration's chance of success.