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Photo: Luis Diaz Devesa/Getty Images

President Trump announced on Twitter Friday evening that tariffs against Mexican goods were "indefinitely suspended" following Mexico's agreement to take stronger measures to curb immigration across the southern border of the U.S.

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Why it matters: This averts a new round of tariffs.

State of play: Mexico is expected to take necessary measures — including increased security — to “greatly reduce, or eliminate, Illegal Immigration coming from Mexico and into the United States.”

  • Had a deal not been reached, a 5% tariff was expected to go into effect starting Monday.
  • The suspension of these tariffs means Trump has avoided a possible Congressional battle, reports Politico.
"We would like to thank Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard for his hard work to negotiate a set of joint obligations that benefit both the United States and Mexico. The United States looks forward to working alongside Mexico to fulfill these commitments so that we can stem the tide of illegal migration across our southern border and to make our border strong and secure."
— U.S. Department of State statement on the conclusion of negotiations

The big picture: Mexico — the United States' top trading partner — traded an estimated $671 billion worth of goods in 2018 according to the Office of the United States Trade Representative.

Details of the deal:

  • Mexico has agreed to deploy 6,000 National Guard troops throughout the country, but will focus on its southern border with Guatemala — where the largest number of migrants trying to cross into the U.S. come from.
  • Mexico has agreed to house migrants seeking asylum in the U.S. — which will include, housing, offering jobs, health care and education — while the U.S. agrees to accelerate asylum claims.
  • If the deal does not have the "expected results," then the 2 nations will meet again in 90 days.
  • There will also be a new focus on regional stability and prosperity, with the U.S. supporting the Comprehensive Development Plan, which focuses on curbing migration, launched by Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras.
A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Go deeper: The behind-the-scenes scramble to announce Trump's Mexico tariff surprise

Go deeper

Senate retirements could attract GOP troublemakers

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.). Photo: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sen. Roy Blunt's retirement highlights the twin challenge facing Senate Republicans: finding good replacement candidates and avoiding a pathway for potential troublemakers to join their ranks.

Why it matters: While the midterm elections are supposed to be a boon to the party out of power, the recent run of retirements — which may not be over — is upending that assumption for the GOP in 2022.

Congressional diversity growing - slowly

Data: Brookings Institution and Pew Research Center; Note: No data on Native Americans in Congress before the 107th Congress; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

The number of non-white senators and House members in the 535-seat Congress has been growing steadily in the past several decades — but representation largely lags behind the overall U.S. population.

Why it matters: Non-whites find it harder to break into the power system because of structural barriers such as the need to quit a job to campaign full time for office, as Axios reported in its latest Hard Truths Deep Dive.

Staff for retiring Senate Republicans a K Street prize

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The retirements of high-profile Senate Republicans mean a lot of experienced staffers will soon be seeking new jobs, and Washington lobbying and public affairs firms are eyeing a potential glut of top-notch talent.

Why it matters: Roy Blunt is the fifth Republican dealmaker in the Senate to announce his retirement next year. Staffers left behind who can navigate the upper chamber of Congress will be gold for the city’s influence industry.